Course Highlight: PSYC 110 Pursuing your Purpose

PSYC 110 – Pursuing your Purpose is a 1/2 credit course that assists students in considering career paths and informs them of the opportunities available to them within the Psychology Department and across the College. The course is particularly well-suited for sophomores or others who have recently declared the major, but all are certainly welcome and have benefited from the course. The course will meet virtually one time a week on Tuesday evenings with part of the class being synchronous and the rest of the work being asynchronous.

Three students that recently took this course, Kristianna Jenner, Emily Gabrielian, and Kristi Rolf took some time to answer questions regarding this course:

Why did you decide to take PSYC 110?

Kristianna Jenner: I decided to take PSYC-110 because I needed a little more direction and guidance. Psychology is just so broad and I felt like I needed a different perspective on the field as well as to gain more practical information for my future.

Emily Gabrielian: After the fall semester of my sophomore year, I decided to switch my major from biochemistry to psychology. I really enjoyed the psychology courses that I had taken before, but I had no idea what I wanted to do with a psychology major. Right after I declared my major in psychology, Dr. Allen recommended this class to me. Dr. Allen emphasized that this class would help me find my path in psychology and would allow me to learn more about the amazing opportunities that Roanoke College and the psychology department has to offer. I decided to take PSYC 110 because I really wanted some guidance on what I wanted to do with my psychology major.

Kristi Rolf: I decided to take PSYC 110 on a friend’s recommendation because I had just declared it as my major and was totally in love with psychology, but had no idea what discipline or career path I wanted to pursue.

What did you and other students do in the class?

Kristianna Jenner: So in the class, we get to learn more about the practicality of the science of psychology. We do our own research to find out what things we are interested in and to find the degree requirements, location of the prevalence of jobs, and also the salaries. All of these are super important for making decisions on where you want to go to school, where you may end up living, and what things you’re genuinely interested in. There is also a community-Based learning aspect of the course, where we go out into the real world here in Salem and the surrounding towns to shadow people who are working in the fields (or are adjacent) you are interested in.

Emily Gabrielian: One of the reasons why I loved this class so much was because of the other students in the class. During this class, the students really get to know one another and become more comfortable with sharing their goals and dreams. Everyone in the class was motivated to learn more about the opportunities that Roanoke has to offer. Also, everyone in the class wanted to discover the potential paths they could go after graduating from Roanoke. It was clear that everyone in the class wanted to grow and develop. I am thankful for this class because it gave me the opportunity to connect with my peers and create new friendships.

Kristi RolfEach week Dr. Powell assigned readings and/or activities on a certain topic that we discussed in class that ranged from potential career choices to resources at Roanoke College. Everything we discussed was backed up by empirical articles and Dr. Powell brought guest speakers in for many classes which really enriched our learning. In the second half of the semester, Dr. Powell and Jesse Griffin from the office of civic engagement helped match each of us to a location for job shadowing where we would complete 20 hours before the end of the semester (sadly last semester we had to cut the job shadowing short due to COVID-19).

How has PSYC 110 helped you and what did you get out of it?

Kristianna Jenner: I learned about aerospace psychology, which might just be the coolest thing ever. I never would have found this entire subfield had I not been in this class. Aerospace psychologists work with airline personnel, airplane manufacturers, engineers, and airlines themselves. They work to help make the skies safer for everyone and the interfaces easier for those working in the airline industry. I found this to feel like it was something I could see myself doing with my life and I found the guidance I wanted out of the class.

Emily GabrielianAlthough our time was cut short due to the Coronavirus, I still got so much out of this class. This class helped me figure out that after Roanoke, I want to go to graduate school in order to further my learning and work towards becoming a counselor. After every class, I was so giddy about all of the opportunities that Roanoke has to offer. I was so excited about the opportunity to study abroad, complete an internship, and conduct research. Also, from my volunteer experience at the West End Center, I realized that in the future I want to work with children. Overall, I got so much more out of this class than what I was expecting. This class truly made me more motivated with my studies and more excited about what the future holds.

Kristi RolfPSYC 110 helped me the most by providing clarity on my degree path at Roanoke and all the resources that are available for me in the department and throughout the College.

Why would you recommend PSYC 110?

Kristianna Jenner: I definitely think that if you’re struggling while considering the future or even if you’re like me, where all you want is just a little more guidance on life, this is the class to take. Overall, I think that this class will only help, never hurt.

Emily Gabrielian: I would recommend PSYC 110 because this class gives you the opportunity to learn more about yourself, but also learn more about what Roanoke has to offer. When I would talk with my friends about this class, they all emphasized how they wished their majors offered a class like this. Even if you know what you are going to do after Roanoke, I still encourage you to take this class because you may discover that there is another path that is more interesting. Also, this class gives you the opportunity to give back to the community and meet new people. I fully recommend taking this class because it will be so beneficial for you and your future.

Kristi RolfI would recommend PSYC 110 because it is a fantastic tool for getting more involved in the department and absorbing lots of wisdom from Dr. Powell which has been invaluable for me!

If you are interested in taking this course or would like to know some more information, please reach out to Dr. Darcey Powell at dpowell@roanoke.edu.

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Appalachian State PsyD Program

Clinical Psychologists study psychopathology in order to assess and diagnose mental disorders.

At Appalachian State University, located in Boone, North Carolina, you can study Clinical Psychology through their Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program.

Through this 5-year program, students follow the practitioner-scientist training model, meaning that you will not only be trained in applied clinical assessment and intervention, but also will be trained in applied research.

According to the Appalachian State Psychology Department “this training program will focus on the impact of culture and diversity on clinical practice, including the factors that affect individual and community development, specifically in rural areas.”

This program is quite selective as only six to eight students are admitted into the program each year. However, each student  that is admitted receives some form of funding through scholarships or assistantships.

If interested in applying, applications are due December 1 and require the following:

  • Graduate School Application
  • Official Transcripts from all universities attended
  • Official GRE score report from test taken within the past 5 years
    • Optional if GPA is 3.0 or higher (required if GPA is less than 3.0)
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Application fee
  • Personal Statement describing academic interests, experience in psychology, career goals, and reasons the applicant is a strong candidate for the Psy.D. program (< 2 double-spaced typed pages)

If interested, our very own, Dr. Hilton, attended Appalachian state and received his B.A. and M.S., so if you have any further questions feel free to contact him at hilton@roanoke.edu.

More information on the program can be found in these two graphics as well as on their official webpage, found here.

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Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
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Interview with alumni Brice Hinkle ’20

In this post, recent alumni Brice Hinkle discusses what she has been up to since graduating from Roanoke College. After graduating in the midst of the pandemic, Brice has some great insight to share with current Roanoke College students and soon-to-be graduates!


Tell us about yourself. What are you up to now?

I got a job at a local Health Food store called Nature’s Outlet back in March. Even though it’s not in the counseling or social work vein I want to go into, I haven’t left because I was learning so much there, but now I actually feel it is time to move on to other things, so I’ll be sending out applications to other places over the next few weeks. Between school and work a lot of my free time was taken up in my undergrad, so I wanted to take some time between undergrad and graduate school to focus on my personal goals that I hadn’t had time for. I’m really into making sample- and synth-based music and yoga as a spiritual practice and lifestyle, so I’ve been trying to dedicate more time to those. I’m searching for jobs through Career Services, my network of friends and family, and Indeed.

Yoga Plants GIF by Ash Sta. Teresa
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How did the pandemic impact your plans for after Roanoke College?

The pandemic has been interesting. A group of friends and I were looking for a place to live and the pandemic put us all on a time crunch to do so and cut my friends jobs temporarily, so being able to make rent was scary for a while.

What was your graduation like? Did you get to step on the seal?

I graduated this past May so I didn’t get much more than a Zoom call, which was still great. But I had already stepped, sat, and even danced on the seal I can’t count how many times every year since my freshman year.

History & Tradition | Roanoke College
https://www.roanoke.edu/images/About/Seal.jpg?width=382

What do you miss about Roanoke College? 

I recently walked around campus again with a friend and I really missed the late nights out with my friends there and the gorgeous campus and views of the sunset. I am happy to have the time to dedicate to exploring other interests now though.

What has been your favorite part of life since graduation?

Honestly, the time I’ve been able to spend on music has really improved my mood stability. I recommend everyone pick up an instrument of some sort.

sad piano GIF by Freddy Arenas
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Where do you hope to be in the future?

I hope to be living somewhere out west, up north, or abroad working with the mentally ill or the youth.

Do you have any advice for students at Roanoke College now?

Don’t do something that you feel your parents or society or your peers expect you to do. Do what you are passionate about and work your tail off for it. Manage your time well and make the most of it, because you only have so much time. Be good to yourself and to others; everyone deserves to be heard and met with patience, compassion, and understanding.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I honestly am saddened by my high school’s attempt at education. I don’t feel that way about Roanoke. You are in a good place, take advantage of it, and revel in it.


Thank you, Brice, for taking the time to answer our questions and congratulations on starting your post-grad life. We look forward to hearing about how you are in the future and will continue to cheer you on! A special thanks for the  kind words you had to share with current Roanoke College students.

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Graduate School Advice Panel

Have you considered graduate school? Are you currently in the process of applying? Or are just looking to explore options post-undergrad?

If so, then join the Graduate School Advice Panel over Zoom on Tuesday, October 27th from 12-1 PM.

Join current Roanoke College Psych Professors and recent Roanoke College Psych Alumni to learn more about graduate school and the application process, as well as to learn general advice about different programs and the graduate school process.

We will be joined by Alumni in a variety of programs ranging from Clinical Psychology to I/O Psychology, all of whom are working towards an M.A., Ph.D., or Psy.D.

If you’re interested in attending join the following Zoom meeting on Tuesday, October 27th at Noon.

Topic: Grad School Info Session

Time: Oct 27, 2020 12:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://roanoke-edu.zoom.us/j/81556902405?pwd=UElKOGZPWlVSSS81N0lXd0ZBOEYyQT09

Meeting ID: 815 5690 2405

Passcode: 310880

We look forward to having you join us!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Specialties in Psychology: Geriatric Psychology

hands from palliative care - Charles E. Smith Life Communities

Are you interested in studying how the mind changes with age? Or maybe you are interested in helping the elderly cope with issues associated with age? Would you like to work within a network of providers to comfort and care for aging patients? If you think that any of these things may interest you, then look into geriatric psychology, also known as geropsychology!

 

As people grow older, they are faced with a variety of different challenges that include physical, emotional, and social impacts. Some of these issues stem from losing loved ones and others around them, while some of these issues are a result of the body breaking down with age. 

 

Geriatric psychologists play a critical role in the care of aging individuals. They may provide counseling for illnesses and diseases or even research the effects of aging. Additionally, if their patient has a serious or terminal prognosis, they may work within a network to provide care for both the patient and their family. There is an increased need for geriatric psychologists as the Baby Boomers age. If you think that this is something that might interest you, use the links below to discover more. 

To find out more, click this link!

For information from the APA on geropsychology, use this link!

For info on careers in aging, visit this link

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Registration 101

It’s almost that time of year again: registration time! Pre-registration advising will begin next week on Monday, October 26 and registration will begin on Monday, November 9. Students should be notified about their registration time in the next few weeks through email and it should be visible on self-service as well. Thus, this post will provide a simple step-by-step guide on how to register for classes as well as some helpful reminders!

How to Register

Self Service helps to organize and visualize your class schedule. Typing in this link https://selfservice.roanoke.edu/Student/ should bring you to the self-service login page. Your username and password is the same for self-service as it is for inquire.

After you log in, you should see the student home page seen below. Click on Student Planning near the bottom left, above Grades.

This should bring you to the student planning page where you can either check your academic progress or register for classes. Click on Plan for your Degree & Register for Classes on the right side of the screen.

Finally, you’ve reached the page where you can schedule your courses. You can use the arrows near the top left to change between terms. To add courses to your schedule, you can search for courses at the top right search bar.

Let’s say you wanted to add psychology 251 to your schedule. You would type it into the search bar and you should be brought the course catalog seen below. Clicking on “Add Course to Plan” and selecting a term won’t put an available class section on your schedule, it will only show the class on the left side bar in the planned classes. You’ll have to manual add a section by clicking view other sections.

 

If you click on “View Available Sections for PSYC-251” you’ll see all sections available for both the current and next term as shown below. Make sure you scroll down and click on “Add Section to Schedule” on a section under Spring Term, 2021.

 

You can also follow this post for instructions on how to register on Ellucian Go app.

On the day of your registration time, a button should appear that says “Register Now” near the top right that if pushed should register you for all classes currently on your course schedule. A confirmation email should be sent that notifies you what classes you have registered for.

If you would like to see these steps in action, Roanoke College provides two videos found here and here on using Self-Service to plan schedules.

Other Tips

Advising Meetings

Meet with your advisor. Some advisors should be reaching out to you this week if they haven’t already for a pre-registration advising meeting. If not, it might be a good idea to reach out to them first. It’s always a great idea to meet with your advisor just to check in with them to make sure you’re taking the right classes and that you’re on the right track to graduate on time.

Your advisor can help you indicate what classes are available next semester but you can (and should) look what is being offered through self-service by typing in the class name or number in the search bar in self-service. You can also search courses through the course catalog on self-service or in the directory.

Plan Ahead

Before you meet with your advisor, pick classes that are required and/or that you want to take and make a draft of your schedule using self-service. Class registration goes in order with those who have the most credits prior to the current term picking their classes first so it is possible that you may not get your first choices. That’s okay! Having a plan B and sometimes even a plan C helps reduce disappointment and worry about not taking classes that are interesting to you but also meet requirements. Here you can check the requirements for majors and concentrations in the psychology department.

Be Early

Remember being early is being on time. Opening self-service a few minutes before your designated time and making sure you’re ready to push that register button may be the difference in you getting your first choice or second choices or not.

Registration can be stressful but your advisors are a great resource and are willing to help. In addition, it gets easier the more times you do it and in no time you’ll be a pro. Good luck Maroons!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

How to “stand out”

No matter what year you are, it is never too early or too “late” to begin considering what you want to do during your time at Roanoke College, in order to stand out to potential future employers or graduate programs. Therefore, whether you are a first-semester freshman or a first-semester senior, there are always things you can be doing on and off campus to prepare you for your future post-grad studies or jobs in psychology.

If you plan to pursue a career or graduate program in psychology then follow this post as a guide to begin building up your resume or CV with experiences that will help you stand out to future employers or programs.

Plan ahead

You do not need to have your future plans set in stone at any point during your college career, but it may be good to start considering different options and creating plans around those options. That is, look at what courses you will need to take to complete your major/minor/concentration and roughly layout when you will take them. Moreover, consider what you do and do not want to do while in college (e.g., internships, research, study abroad, etc.). This initial planning stage will help you in the long run but is not limited to those in their freshman year.

Seniors, planning may look different, but consider different post-grad options and begin looking at what they require. From here, plan out what to do during your final two semesters and post-undergrad to help you get into the job/programs that you are looking into.

Explore options

When considering what you want to do in psychology consider the multiple options available to you. Look into different career paths, graduate programs, or post-grad internships and research opportunities. Do not be afraid to take a gap year after graduating from Roanoke College to explore these options and to gain some more work experience or research/internship experience. There is no specific plan that you need to follow to become a successful psychologist, so look into options to find a plan that works best for you.

Look at expectations/requirements

If you are looking to enter into a graduate program or a specific job, look at the application requirements and deadlines early on. Even if you have no idea where you want to go or what you want to do, looking into different programs and seeing what they require of applicants is a good start. In doing so, you may find that multiple programs are expecting similar requirements such as research experience or a GRE score. In noticing these commonalities, you can adjust what you are doing to ensure you complete these items on time.

Get involved

It goes without saying, but getting involved is important to all employers and graduate programs. Whether it be gaining world-experience in the form of internships, study abroad, or jobs, or gaining academic experience in the form of research, honor societies, and a variety of courses, or through being apart of outside activities such as sports teams, and other clubs and organizations, it is beneficial to get involved both on and off-campus.

Consider an internship

An internship is one of the best ways to gain work experience while in undergrad. Not only are internships a way to build connections, they also give you real-world experience, and introduce you into the field you may be interested in. Moreover, they are also beneficial as they can lead you to realize you want to pursue a different path. Do not feel discouraged if an internship leaves you wanting to explore a new area as this is equally as beneficial as an internship that proves to you that you are on the right path.

All in all, internships can help guide you in solidifying your interests as well as showcase to you what your interests may not be.

More information on internships can be found here

Consider research

If you plan to enter into a graduate program, specifically a Ph.D. track, considering research is highly important. Most graduate programs suggest or require that you have some research experience at hand. While taking quantitative methods and research methods is a good introduction to research, conducting research alongside a psychology faculty or other students is a way to further enhance those skills. Moreover, conducting research can lead you to present at conferences or getting published, which as an undergraduate is a major accomplishment.

More information on the research can be found here!

Consider studying abroad

While studying abroad is not for everyone, it is a great experience that not only enhances cultural knowledge but leads to self-development. Studying abroad offers a lot of self-development that can be beneficial and will look notable when applying to jobs or graduate programs. There are a variety of study abroad options available, and if you plan ahead early, you can ensure that courses you take while abroad can fill requirements you may need, as well as find a semester where studying abroad works best for you.

More information on studying abroad can be found here!

Reach out to Professors/Advisors

After reading all of these options you may feel lost, which is completely normal! That said, you are not alone and your professors and advisors can be a great resource in guiding you towards your next steps. Reach out to your advisors if you are struggling with where to begin or on what you can achieve during your semesters at Roanoke College. Moreover, reach out to professors that share similar interests to learn more about how they went about applying to programs, finding jobs, or for advice on what specific things you should or could be doing.

Here are current professors specialties and interests:

Dr. Allen: Psychopharmacology and abnormal psychology

Dr. Buchholz: Self, consciousness, evolutionary psychology, and moral decision making

Dr. Carter: Social and personality psychology

Dr. Cate: Cognitive and neuroscience

Dr. FVN: Developmental, social, and educational psychology

Dr. Hilton: Clinical and cognitive psychology

Dr. Nichols: Cognitive neuroscience

Dr. Osterman: Social psychology and evolutionary psychology

Dr. Powell: Developmental psychology

Dr. Wetmore: Experimental psychology and cognitive psychology

More information about specific professors’ interests can be found here!

Start drafting your Resume and cover letter, and/or your CV and purpose statement

If you are interested in pursuing a career or graduate school in psychology then you want to start drafting your CV and purpose statement. On the other hand, if you are looking to go into more general work, you should have an updated resume and cover letter. Whether it be your CV or Resume, these items should be updated when major changes are made, or at least at the beginning and end of each semester, or before they are to be submitted to someone.

Cover letters and purpose statements can be made quite broad to begin with but should always be specified to match the program you are going into.

More information on how to write a CV can be found here!

Refer to the Roanoke College Psychology page for more information

You may still be feeling a bit overwhelmed on where to begin and where to go for information. While the blog will continue to share advice and information on graduate school or post-grad career information, you may also refer to the Roanoke College Psychology Page for more resources and information.

Best of luck to all of you as you continue on your journey towards becoming a psychologist and know that the fifth floor is always cheering you on and here to help (even if virtually)!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
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Local Organization Highlight: Mainstream Mental Health Services

Who are they?

Mainstream Mental Health Services provides goal-directed training to individuals who have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Their services are intended to support the individual in achieving and/or maintaining independence within their community in the most appropriate and least restrictive environment. It is Mainstream’s mission to enable eligible older adolescents and adults to acquire life skills and develop stronger family and community relationships that will enhance their quality of life in the mainstream community.

Mainstream’s three main areas of service include mental health skills building, psychosocial rehabilitation, and an outpatient crisis stabilization and outpatient psychotherapy unit. Roanoke College students have previously held internships with the psychosocial rehabilitation (PSR) program.

What do they do?

Mental Health Skills Building: a Qualified Mental Health Professional provides individual – one to one service – focused on the individual client’s personal goals and individual service plan. Mainstream follows a supportive strength-based approach to helping individuals recognize personal strengths and natural supports that help support a happier, fulfilling life.

PSR: person-centered service emphasizing a continuum of psychoeducational programming, daily life skills training, socialization opportunities, and satisfying recreational activities in a group setting. Provides an individual with an opportunity to move from social isolation to interacting with others in a positive, supportive environment.

Bridges to hope: Mainstream Outpatient Crisis Stabilization and Outpatient Psychotherapy Services, also referred to as Bridges to Hope, aims to provide quality, immediate interventions and ongoing support focused on stability with the least restrictive treatment possible. Programming will vary from day to day, depending on the needs of individuals in the program.

How can YOU get involved?

Mainstream values the opportunity to provide undergraduate and graduate level internships for individuals pursuing a career in the mental health field. Internships are centered around learning experiences and supervision that provide a basic, yet fundamental skill set that is the root of all direct mental health service practices. Students seeking an internship with Mainstream Mental Health Services, Inc. should be pursuing a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in one of the following areas:

  • Psychology
  • Human Services
  • Sociology
  • Social Work
  • Counseling

More information about internship opportunities can be found here on their webpage. You can also reach out to psychology department professors and fellow students who have had experience working with Mainstream. The Internship Director for Psychology is Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand, findley@roanoke.edu, office 509-B Life Science.

Cat Reaction GIF


You can find more information on Mainstream Mental Health Services’ website: https://mainstreammh.com/ If you are interested in volunteering and not committing to a full internship experience, try reaching out to Bobbi Cook at bcook@mmhservices.com to see what alternative opportunities they have available. Make sure you tell her that you are from Roanoke College!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Upcoming Out of the Darkness Walk

Each year, Roanoke College is proud to host the Out of the Darkness Walk for suicide prevention and mental health awareness. While much of this year looks different, Psi Chi and RCPA are proud to continue to host this event.

On Saturday, October 10, 2020, at 11:00 AM, join members of Psi Chi and RCPA, as well as the greater Roanoke College Community to take part in this walk! We will be meeting outside in the parking lot near the Life Science Building. If you plan to walk in person please follow the COVID guidelines and precautions set forth by the CDC, VA State Health Department, and Roanoke College by wearing a mask, practicing social distancing and most importantly by staying home if you are feeling ill, have any symptoms of COVID-19, or have been around someone who tested positive for COVID-19.

If you do not feel comfortable meeting in person, no worries, just  walk whenever you can Saturday and wherever you feel most comfortable! Moreover, you can scan the QR code on the poster above to join our team and help raise donations to support the American Foundation for suicide prevention.

We look forward to walking with you Saturday, wherever you may be, and appreciate any and all support!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Interview With Alumna Lauren Furlow ’19

Lauren Furlow, Class of 2019

In this post, recent alumna Lauren Furlow discusses what she has been up to since graduating from Roanoke College. She is currently attending graduate school and has an interest in researching within the field of LGBTQ+ psychology and spiritual trauma. Lauren also had some kind words to say to current Roanoke College students, and would love to give some advice on life after college.


Tell us about yourself. What are you up to now?

I am a first-year graduate student at Marshall University in the PsyD program. When looking at graduate programs, I searched the APA website for accredited programs in the area & type of program I wanted to study.

Home - Marshall University Medical H.E.L.P. Program
https://www.marshall.edu/medhelp/

How did the pandemic impact your plans for after Roanoke College?

Thankfully, I was not impacted too much. Some of my classes are still in-person but a few are virtual.

What was your graduation like? Did you get to step on the seal?

I was a December 2019 graduate. I was not planning to attend the graduation ceremony in May, 2020 so COVID-19 didn’t change anything for me.

What has been your favorite part of life since graduation?

I moved to West Virginia in May of 2020 and I adopted a puppy in June! His name is Malakai and he is a lab-mix.

Malakai

Where do you hope to be in the future?

Next year, I hope to have been successful in my first year of graduate school and studying for my master’s test! I will also be starting to work with patients in a clinical setting. In 5 years, (I hope) I am finishing my internship placement and looking for a full-time job after applying for my license to practice clinical psychology.

Do you have any advice and/or uplifting words for students at Roanoke College now?

Your professors understand what an unusual time this is. If you are struggling, you are most definitely NOT the only one. Talk to your professors, they want to help you and they want to see you succeed.


Thank you, Lauren, for taking the time to answer our questions and congratulations on graduate school. We look forward to hearing about how it goes in the future and will continue to cheer you on!