Elon Musk announces first successful Neuralink Implant

January 29, 2024

**This post has been edited to reflect more recent information**

In an X (formerly known as Twitter) post, Elon Musk announced that Neuralink has successfully implanted its first brain-computer chip into a human. He says the patient is “recovering well.”

Neuralink is a company whose mission is to improve the lives of people with severe mobility challenges. The focus is specifically on quadriplegia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), both of which are debilitating diseases affecting movement intention and control. Neuralink hopes to use their technology in the future to blur the lines between human brain and computer. That is, they aim to bridge the gap between our conscious experience and the digital world.

However, according to recent sources, there is no peer-reviewed evidence to suggest Musk’s implant was a success, nor is there evidence to suggest that the chip was implanted. In addition, although the news has focused on Neuralink, there are scores of other companies developing similar technology: Kernel, MindMaze, EMOTIV, Blackrock Neurotech, and others. Musk’s deception of the IRB in addition to his breech of ethics has, according to The Guardian, resulted in a federal inquiry into Neuralink’s research practice. Perhaps the most concerning, and likely the catalyst of this inquiry, is a report detailing how the company euthanized at least six monkeys at the request of veterinarians due to significant health issues.

There are, of course, ethical standards that must be kept to ensure patients’ privacy is protected. This is especially important given Neuralink’s ultimate goal, which is to allow humans to control technology with their thoughts. The PRIME study, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in May, is under supervision from a third-party institutional review board. Still, because this is such an unprecedented leap in human endeavor, there is much to be debated about how to study and use this technology ethically.

For more information, check out: https://neurosciencenews.com/neuralink-human-implant-22542/

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2022/dec/05/neuralink-animal-testing-elon-musk-investigation

AND Neuralink’s website: www.neuralink.com

Course Highlight: PSYC-327 Interpersonal Relationships

Dr. Powell’s Interpersonal Relationships course discusses family, peer, and romantic relationships. Delving into the science of relationships, students read an empirical article related to the day’s topic and then discuss the article, as well as other research, on the day’s topic in class. Throughout the semester, students are assisted in the development of an infographic on a topic of their choosing. A sampling of the infographics completed by the students this past fall semester are shared below!

Christopher Resendiz’ Infographic, “Online Dating: Deception and Modality Switching”

Sydney Wagner’s Infographic, “Debunking the Myth that ‘Opposites Attract'”

Jenna Santos’ Infographic, “FOMO In Social Media & Relationships”

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Twitter: @RC_Psychology

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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

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FREE APA VIRTUAL GRADUATE SCHOOL FAIR APRIL 17, 2024!

Interested in graduate school? If so, the APA Education Directorate has announced that they will be hosting a Virtual Psychology Graduate School Fair on Wednesday, April 17th from 12pm-4pm! This may be 3 months away, but save your spot by registering today! Registration for all prospective psychology graduate students is FREE through this link.

Students who register will have the opportunity to meet virtually with recruiters from any of the participating programs during the event hours. Individuals can come for a short time and meet with a select few recruiters or stay for the whole event and meet with everyone, depending on their schedule and interest. Similarly, participating graduate schools will be able to contact registered student both before and after the event to distribute information about their program or to arrange meetings with prospects at the event.

Goals of The Event:

APA intends to virtually connect graduate psychology programs with a diverse group of students seeking to further their education beyond their current degree. The APA Psychology Graduate School Fair is open to all graduate psychology degree (MA/MS/PsyD/PhD/EdD/Other) granting institutions in the U.S. and Canada, and all areas of psychology are encouraged to participate, including health service psychology, scientific and applied psychology, and general psychology programs.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

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Roanoke Alum, Maryam Nishtar, Has Been Published!

Abstract:

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder where two-thirds of the affected population are women. Along with cognitive impairments, AD is associated with behavioral changes such as aggression towards caretakers. The limbic system consists of various brain structures that play a role in emotions and behavioral reactions. Some of the limbic system- related areas are the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, corpus collosum (CC), and white matter (WM). Cognitive changes with AD can be measured using the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale. Physical changes in living patients require brain imaging tools, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). As there is currently sparse research present for these areas relating to the female brain, we used clinical data and FreeSurfer-processed imaging data from an open-access database, OASIS-3, to explore the associations between dementia severity and the volume of the limbic system-related brain components in women. A control group consisted of participants with no dementia and multiple brain scans while comparison groups consisted of participants with a single brain scan and 1) no dementia 2) mild dementia or 3) moderate/severe dementia. Hemisphere differences with increasing CDR were found for the thalamus as well as simple hemisphere differences for the hippocampus, thalamus, and WM. When using age-matched controls and normalized volume data, the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and CC volumes for subjects with AD were different than those in the control group, with the amygdala and hippocampus also showing statistically significant volume loss with increasing dementia severity. As the areas included in this study are related to the limbic system, this provides insight into the physical changes occurring in the brain of women with increasing AD, who often show changes in emotions. This can be an area to longitudinally explore whether there are associated behavioral changes as physical changes at the individual level occur over time.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Dr. Lauren Kennedy-Metz, Assistant Professor, Has Been Published!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

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2023-24 Fall Undergraduate Research Grant Recipient: Raegan Middelthon

It is with great enthusiasm that we announce the achievement of Raegan Middelthon, a senior in the psychology department! She has been awarded a 2023-24 Fall Undergraduate Research Grant from Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. Her research proposal titled “The Influence of Tik Tok on Perceptions of Relationships: Is Tik Tok Associated with Relationship Dissatisfaction, Sexism, and the Desire for a Partner”, has earned a well-deserved place among the select few recognized by the Psi Chi Grants Committee and the Board of Directors. She has been working with Dr. Buchholz on this project, and they were even given the opportunity to present their research at a recent conference!

Psi Chi is contributing $1,500 to Raegan’s research project, aimed to unveil the influence of social media, and its potential impact on relationship perceptions. The psychology department echoes our sincerest congratulations to both Raegan Middelthon and Dr. Buchholz. Their dedication to advancing psychological research is commendable and inspiring!

Are you interested in doing research while studying at Roanoke? Talk to your psychology advisor to learn more about the opportunities that await you!

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

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Essential Visionaries Renewable $5,000 and $10,000 Scholarships!

Renewable $5,000 and $10,000/year Scholarships for future Teachers, Counselors, Social Workers, Psychologists, and Nurses.

The Essential Visionaries Scholarship is awarding 100 renewable scholarships to help students pursuing degrees in Education, Counseling, Social Work, Psychology or Pre-Nursing/Nursing. 

To apply applicants must: 

  • Be high school seniors or graduates or current college undergraduates in the United States
  • Plan to enroll in part-time or full-time undergraduate study at an accredited two- or four-year college, university or vocational-technical school for the entire upcoming academic year
  • Be seeking a degree or certificate in Education, Counseling,  Social Work, Psychology or Pre-Nursing/Nursing
  • Demonstrate Financial Need
  • Have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale (or its equivalent)

To learn more and apply, click here. Deadline to apply is January 8, 2024. 

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Volunteer Opportunity with Conversations to Remember: Free, Virtual, and Meaningful

Conversations to Remember is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, dedicated towards combating loneliness and isolation felt by senior citizens. The organization has created a virtual visit program which 2-3 college students with residents of long-term care, assisted living, and memory care communities for virtual video visits.

These residents have been suffering from isolation, and you could really brighten their days just by speaking with them. Conversations to Remember provides training and support throughout your service. Since these visits are virtual, you can do it without any travel! This is both convenient, and allows more of your valuable time to be spent volunteering, rather than commuting to the volunteering location. This program is offered free of charge to seniors across the country, and there are active student volunteers from around the country as well.

Typically, you will volunteer 1-2 hours per week. Each call lasts up to one hour, based on the senior’s attention span and mood on each day. Conversations to Remember expects students to volunteer for approximately 16 weeks, so that you can build a friendship with the senior. This does not need to coincide with the start of a semester, as new seniors start all the time, and new volunteers are trained weekly. Volunteers are matched based on the times that they’re available, with a senior who is available at the same time, and they will have a regular, weekly appointment for their visit. Students wishing for more visits or other opportunities that allow them to volunteer more frequently can be accommodated with different ways to volunteer, such as assisting us with the organization’s social media, call support, or outreach.

Please feel free to look through the organization’s website here. You can register to volunteer by filling out a volunteer interest form here.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Roanoke Faculty and Alumnus at The National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) 2023 Annual Conference

The psychology department is excited to share a glimpse into a recent conference experience that not only showcased a depth of academic exploration but also highlighted the power of collaboration and shared passion. This year Dr. Powell presented the work of herself and co-authors, Dr. FVN, and Kosovare Fetinci (’23) at the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) 2023 Annual Conference in Florida. She also presented a second research poster with Dr. Mayer (sport management), and their son!

The above image displays on a remarkable poster featuring Dr. Powell and co-authors, Dr. FVN and, Roanoke alum, Kosovare Fetinci (’23). The collaborative effort was rooted in Kosovare’s senior independent study project, a testament to the dedication and enthusiasm that students bring to their academic endeavors. The title of the project was “Friendship Dissolutions in Emerging Adulthood: Differing Reactions Based on Type and Role in Dissolution”.

A second presentation by Dr. Powell was a joint effort with Dr. Mayer, a dynamic combination of expertise that undoubtedly brought a unique perspective to the conference. What’s even more special is that their son joined in on the presentation, turning it into a family affair! This research was titled “Parental Leave Options For Professional Athletes: Negative Media Reactions May Not Be Reality of Fans’ Attitudes”

The great positive feedback received from fellow conference attendees is a testament to the quality and impact of their work. It’s always gratifying when your efforts are not only recognized but also appreciated by your peers. The exchange of ideas and the validation of hard work create an inspiring environment that fuels further academic exploration. Conferences are a great way to expand your knowledge and share your research!

In addition the two noted presentations, Morgan Hamilton’s (Roanoke alum, ’21) oral presentation based on her master’s thesis was also a great success. Titled “Now I understand who I am and where I came from: The tribal reunification of indigenous fostered/adopted relatives,” Morgan’s presentation delved into a crucial and often overlooked aspect of identity and belonging. Congratulations Morgan – you are absolutely representing the Roanoke psychology department well!

As we reflect on these academic triumphs, let us celebrate the dedication, passion, and collaborative spirit that drive the pursuit of knowledge. To all the authors and presenters of the NCFR conference, congratulations!

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Undergraduate Scholars Program: A Great Opportunity for Underrepresented Ethnic/Racial Minorities

Please consider this amazing opportunity for mentored studies and career development! The program focuses on supporting undergraduate students who are looking to pursue graduate work or a career in adolescent development. You can find the link to more information and the application at the bottom of this post.



IT’S TIME TO APPLY FOR THE 2024 UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARS PROGRAM!
The Undergraduate Scholars Program is designed to support junior and senior undergraduate students from racial/ethnic minority groups in North America to pursue graduate work and careers in adolescent development. Selected scholars attend the SRA Annual Meeting and participate in special activities that focus on careers in adolescent researchapplying to graduate school and fundingcurriculum vitae workshops, and navigating the Annual Meeting. The Undergraduate Scholars will receive mentorship from graduate students and senior scholars who are active in the field of adolescent research. Junior/senior undergraduate students from North America who are interested in pursuing a career in the field of adolescence and are a member of an underrepresented ethnic/racial minority group (African American, Latino/Hispanic, Native American/American Indian, Asian and/or Pacific Islander) are eligible. Applicants must become SRA members. 

As a scholar, students will:
– Attend the SRA Annual Meeting, including Undergraduate Scholars Program events.
– Receive complimentary travel to the meeting and hotel accommodations. 
– Receive mentorship by graduate students and senior scholars before, during, and after the meeting.
– Maintain contact with mentors before, during, and after attending the meeting.
– Keep the SRA office informed of contact information for five years following the meeting.

Complete application (including letter of reference) is due on December 8, 2023. APPLICATION AND INFORMATION ARE FOUND HERE! DON’T MISS OUT!

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Roanoke Students & Faculty at the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists 2023 Annual Conference

The image above depicts Eddie Rygalski (left) and Dr. Buchholz (right) presenting their research during the poster session. All featured Roanoke authors included: Eddie Rygalski, Reagan Middelthon, Dr. Findley-Van-Nostrand, Dr. Carter, and Dr. Buchholz.

Over this past weekend, the Roanoke College psychology department was represented well at the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists (SSSP) 2023 Annual Conference in Charlotte, NC. Two students and three faculty members were named authors on research presented during the conference. Congratulations to all of our presenters, the psychology department commends you for your excellent research and dedication to the field. Please find their research titles and abstracts below.

PERSONALIZED ACCOUNTS OF HARM LEAD TO INCREASED EMPATHY FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE SUFFERED BECAUSE OF THE OVERTURNING OF ROE V. WADE (Raegan Middelthon, Eddie Rygalski, and Dr. Chris Buchholz) Many women have been harmed by the limitations placed on abortion after the overturning of Roe v. Wade. Research in empathy has pointed to a spotlight effect, where we feel more empathy in response to personalized accounts of suffering than more generalized accounts. In this study, we randomly assigned participants to read a personalized account of a woman who suffered medical complications because of the restrictive nature of abortion access in her state, a more generalized account, or a control group. As expected, liberals expressed significantly higher levels of empathy for women who have suffered as a result of the overturning of Roe v. Wade. We also found a significant effect for condition, where the highest empathy was reported for the personalized story followed by the generalized story and finally the control group. This pattern held up for conservatives; they reported significantly more empathy when they read the personalized story. Women expressed significantly more empathy than men. Interestingly, women expressed high levels of empathy regardless of which story they read, while men reported the highest empathy for the personal story.

POSITIVE INTEGRATION AND ADVERSE EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH RECREATIONAL PSILOCYBIN USE: A CORRELATIONAL STUDY (Edward Rygalski and Dr. Christopher Buchholz) This exploratory study sought to determine the relationship between positive integration of the psilocybin experience, occurrence of adverse effects, dosage, and factors including age, gender, as well as a variety of other measurements. Clinical literature suggests that psilocybin, when paired with psychotherapy, is a relatively safe and effective treatment for conditions such as depression, anxiety, and addiction. As many people use psychedelics outside the clinic, we sought to determine whether predictors of adverse events and positive integration were consistent between clinical and recreational use. Using two studies, first a content analysis of online reports, and second an international survey of those with experience with psilocybin, we determined that doses greater than 5g expose individuals to increased and unnecessary risk and that a lack of trust in co-present individuals may exacerbate adverse effects. Finally, we found that those who scored higher on measures of empathy tended to also report positive integration, and those who scored lower on measures of purpose in life reported more adverse effects. However, directional causality remains unresolved.

FACT OR FICTION: DO FACIAL AUGMENTATION FILTERS ON TIK TOK IMPACT SELF ESTEEM AND PERCEPTIONS OF ATTRACTIVENESS? (Raegan Middelthon, and Dr. Christopher Buchholz) The popular social sharing app “Tik Tok” has become a cultural staple. Alongside its increasing popularity, public concern has risen over its unique hyper-realistic facial augmentation filters. Many users have claimed that these filters are facilitating the creation of unattainable beauty standards, and damaging self esteem. While work has been done exploring social media’s role in these areas, to our knowledge, the current study is the first to explore the impact of Tik Tok’s filters on self esteem and the perception of both individual and others’ attractiveness. In a series of 3 studies, we presented subjects on Prolific with women in filtered and unfiltered videos. Though many are worried that users cannot detect a filter on a video, we found that users were generally able to tell when one was being used. The presence of a filter did not impact ratings of self attractiveness. However, we discovered that men’s state self esteem was negatively affected when confronted with filtered videos; this effect was not found in women, contrary to our hypothesis. Filtered videos were also rated as more attractive, mainly due to male ratings.

SHORT-TERM LONGITUDINAL ASSOCIATIONS AMONG YOUNG ADULTS’ SOCIAL GOALS, RELATIONAL AGGRESSION, FORMS OF PROSOCIAL BEHAVIORS, AND SELF-PERCEIVED STATUS (Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand) Adolescent relational aggression (RA) is consistently related to popularity and status striving, and adolescent use of prosociality for self-gain is related to higher striving for status and peer-reported popularity, whereas prosociality aimed at benefitting others is related to higher communal motives and being liked by peers. Emerging adults also experience RA by peers, and show distinctive use of forms of prosociality. However, these peer dynamics are not well-understood in emerging adults. The present study tested whether social goals for popularity and social preference predict changes in self-reported RA and forms of prosocial behaviors (altruistic and public forms) across two time points, 8 months apart (data collected via Prolific; N=215; using existing and reliable assessments). Path modeling found popularity goals predict increases in RA and public prosociality and decreases in altruistic prosociality, whereas preference goals show the inverse of each of these associations over time. RA partially mediated effects of both popularity and preference goals at T1 on dominance at T2. Results suggest that use of RA for enhancing peer social status is not limited to adolescence.

REFLECTING ON EXPERIENTIAL PURCHASES HAS DOWNSTREAM CONSEQUENCES ON COGNITION (Dr. Travis Carter) Prior research has found that experiences tend to be more satisfying than material possessions in part because they are more closely associated with the self-concept. The present studies aim to examine whether spending some time reflecting on material or experiential purchase would impact downstream cognitive processing. In Study 1, participants who first reflected on an experience, rather than a possession, exhibited more global (vs. local) processing of stimuli on the Navon (1977) letter task. In Study 2, after a purchase reflection, participants performed an approach/avoidance task, using a joystick to categorize trait words as positive or negative. There was an interaction such that participants in the experiential condition were generally faster to categorize self-relevant traits across trial types. However, material participants were only faster to categorize self-relevant traits on the congruent trials, but not incongruent trials. Thus, the act of reflecting on a recent experiential (vs. a material) purchase had downstream consequences on cognitive tasks: participants adopted a more global mindset (Study 1) and processed self-relevant stimuli more quickly (Study 2).

Because of involvement like this, the psychology department at Roanoke College remains well-renowned. Congratulations, again, to all of our presenters!

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

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A Summary of Last Week’s Faculty Panel on Graduate School Programs

Making the decision to go to graduate school is a big one. It requires a great deal of research and reflection to ensure you are making the best decision for yourself and your future. On Wednesday, October 25th, Dr. Carter led a faculty panel to discuss grad school and provide tips and advice for prospective applicants. If you weren’t able to attend the panel, please review the following notes if you think they could be of interest to you!

Dr. Daniel Nasrallah is an assistant professor in the Chemistry department here at Roanoke College. He applied to 11 schools nationwide and was accepted to four of them, eventually landing himself to earn a PhD from the University of Michigan. He chose the University of Michigan over other schools because there were five faculty that he was interested in working with. It is extremely important to research faculty at the schools you are looking at, because if there isn’t at least a couple that you would be happy working with, that school might not be right for you. To kick off your grad school search, he recommended researching the top 10 programs in your desired field, and then reaching out to undergraduate faculty and current graduate students in those programs to get more insight. Dr. Nasrallah suggested knowing what your end goals are, and keeping your motivations in sight throughout your time in school. He also found it important to note the differences between graduate school and medical school—in terms of money—when making your decision. Medical school acquires debt, whereas he was offered a stipend through agreeing to teach throughout his time at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Wen Bu, who went to law school and practiced as a lawyer before going back to get her PhD at the University of Minnesota, offered tips on transitioning from being a successful student to balancing coursework and producing research. Dr. Bu is now an assistant professor in the psychology department. In graduate school it is equally important to avidly complete coursework and to complete meaningful research. She also discussed the differences between a terminal master’s degree and a PhD. If you are applying for a PhD program, some schools will allow you to earn an MA on the way, and others won’t. This is important to consider because if you were to drop out after, say, 3 years, at some schools, you can leave with an MA, and at others, you would leave with no degree.

Dr. Matthew Trumbo-Tual, from the Roanoke College modern language department, earned a PhD at the University of Virginia. He provided advice for graduate school applicants interested more specifically in the humanities. He suggested taking advice from your Roanoke faculty, but also remembering that graduate school is ever-changing, meaning do your own research in addition to considering the experience of past grad school students. He also recommended getting work experience outside of academia before applying for a PhD, as this is the path that he followed. This allowed him to not feel “stuck” at any point in the process, and he knew he would have options down the line, if grad school didn’t work out, or if his goals changed. A final remark spoke to being intentional in each step of the grad school process – know why you want to be there and make progress that gets you closer to your goals.

Finally, Dr. Wale Sekoni works in the computer science department at Roanoke College. He earned a PhD from the University of Wyoming and suggested prospective applicants find someone they want to work with and be flexible with their goals. He also mentioned the importance of putting thought into your application and having strong letters of recommendation. Many of the other panelists also supported the idea that strong letters of recommendation make a big difference, so make use of your time with professionals you meet throughout your time prior to graduate school.

Overall, the panel offered insight on how to stand out in your grad school applications. In the humanities, being knowledgeable in multiple languages can help you stand out. For chemistry applicants, published work and research experience can help you stand out, as well as having strong and specific letters of recommendation. For law school, undergraduate GPA, LSAT scores, and letters of recommendation are very important.

No matter what field you are looking to pursue, doing your research and being aware of all the details of the graduate school process can help you make the best decision for yourself and your future. If you have further questions or would like to discuss any these panelists experiences with them, please find their contact information on the Roanoke College website.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Paid Research Position: Accepting Application Now!

Dr. Meike Van der Heijden is a new researcher joining the faculty at Fralin Biomedical Research Institute this January.  She uses mouse models to study cerebellar contributors to health and disease and she’s looking for a paid Research Assistant (and is open to interviewing undergraduate students for that role) to start in early January. 

To apply and view more information about the open position, such as qualifications, start date, and job description, please visit https://careers.pageuppeople.com/968/cw/en-us/job/527207/research-assistant.

To explore her lab website to look into more specifics about Dr. Meike Van der Heijden and her research, please visit https://vanderheijdenlab.com/.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: 
@RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: 
http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Midterm Stress Relief

Are you feeling the pressure of midterms week on the Roanoke College campus? Don’t worry, you are not alone! In this blog post, we will look at some of the resources available on campus to help manage stress and make midterms week a bit more bearable. Midterm week can be a stressful time for college students, but it doesn’t have to be. With the help of Roanoke College’s campus resources, students can practice self-care and find strategies to manage their stress levels during this hectic time. So, if you’re feeling overwhelmed, read on to find out how you can make midterms week a little less stressful.

Make your best efforts to adhere to the following reminders:

  • Manage your time! Whether this be in consideration of course work, exercise, sleep, mental health needs, etc., make a plan of when you’re going to set aside time for each of these to-dos and stick to your schedule!
  • Learn to say no! Manage your expectations for yourself and learn to prioritize certain needs/responsibilities over others.
  • Get quality sleep!  We know that sleep is beneficial for our mental and physical wellbeing. Make it a priority this week in order to be a better version of yourself. You, and others, will be happier if you do this!
  • Take breaks! Studying for hours on end can become ineffective at a certain rate. Take 5-15-minute breaks when you start to catch yourself dozing off or not entirely focused on the material. Get some fresh air, go on a short walk, grab a healthy snack, chat with a friend and take a deep breath… it’s almost fall break!

Below is a schedule of events/activities being hosted on campus within the next week. While you’re creating a schedule for yourself, block out some time to attend at least 1 of the following events. Your brain and body will be glad that you did!

TOMORROW, OCTOBER 7th

Out of the Darkness Walk – A community walk to raise awareness and funding for suicide prevention and mental health awareness. Check-in is at 9:00am and the opening ceremony begins at 10:00am.

Register here: https://supporting.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=9239

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8

4:00-5:00 – Cycle Jam (Alumni 211)

MONDAY, OCTOBER 9

4:45-5:45 – Spin Class (Alumni 211)

7:30-8:30 – Line Dance (Bast 109)

  • Learned and review a variety of line dance songs.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10

12:00-2:00 – Pickleball with students, faculty and staff (Bast Gym)

  • No equipment needed!

4:30-5:15 – Meditation Sound Bath Session #1 (Colket Center Ballroom)

  • Listening to music helps you relax and release stress.
  • Sign Up at the Info Desk

5:00-6:00 – Body Pump (Bast 109)

  • Total body workout class using light to moderate weights with lots of repetition.

5:30-6:15 – Meditation Sound Bath Session #2 (Colket Center Ballroom)

  • Listening to music helps you relax and release stress.
  • Sign Up at the Info Desk

6:15-7:15 – Lower Body Sculpt (Bast 109)

  • Focuses on movements that target and strengthen the muscles in and around your legs/glutes.
  • Some cardio involved.

7:30-8:15 – Mindfulness Meditation and Stretching (Bast 109)

  • Guides you through breathing and meditational exercises.
  • Relieves mental stress and improves concentration.
  • Involves gentle yoga, stretching and more!

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11

4:45-5:45 – Kickboxing (Bast 109)

  • Cardio style class using kickboxing techniques to have a good workout.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12

12:00-2:00 – Pickleball with students, faculty and staff (Bast Gym)

  • No equipment needed!

4:45-5:45 – Body Pump (Bast 109)

  • Total body workout class using light to moderate weights with lots of repetition.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: 
@RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: 
http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Helpful Hints From Psych Department Professors! They Know A Thing Or Two…

Are you an undergraduate student looking for tips and tricks to help you succeed in your studies? Look no further!

The Psychology Department at Roanoke College has gathered advice from our experienced professors to help you get the most out of your undergraduate career. In this post, we will discuss the top tips and tricks for undergraduate success, courtesy of our very own professors. We have also asked professors to advise specifically to the feat of preparing and applying for graduate schools. There is a lot of great information that will truly help you make the most out of your time and successfully prepare yourself for what is to come! You can only benefit in learning from those who have achieved before you.

Dr. Buchholz quotes Albert Einstein in saying that “Genius is 1% talent and 99% percent hard work. Thinking is hard work; that’s why so few do it.”  

  • According to research into growth mindset and academic success, the biggest factor in academic success is effort; and effort does not always mean the amount of time you spend. While many things like writing a paper or studying for a test do take time, it is crucial that the time you spend is spent wisely—some methods of studying are more effective than others.
  • Reach out to your instructors and advisors for help navigating how to be both efficient and effective. Your professors spent many years figuring out how do this well and all of us chose to teach at Roanoke College because we care about helping our students thrive.  
  • In addition to putting in the work, wellbeing is another critical component to academic success and thriving as a human being. Take care of yourself, get enough sleep, develop self-compassion for your shortcomings, try mindfulness practices like meditation, exercise, and most importantly, spend time with others.  

Dr. Allen speaks to cultivating relationships, getting letters of recommendation and building a resume for yourself:

  • Cultivate relationships with faculty so that professors can write you a meaningful letter of recommendation when the time comes. These letters of recommendation are so important! Your quantifiable information like GPA and GREs can get you on a short list, but then it’s activities and your letter and your LORs that make the difference whether you get the nod or not. 
  • If you can, get an internship in a relevant organization.  That way you can get a LOR from someone who has seen you in a situation that’s different from what your professors have seen.

Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand provides students with numerous tips on preparing for graduate school and life after Roanoke:

  • Think about grad school as prep for your career… what do you want to do longer term? Make sure your program gets you there (especially in Psych, where programs have a very wide range of intended outcomes).
  • If you want a Ph.D. – why? Many students aim for this without recognizing that the career they want might not require a Ph.D. (for instance, counseling or social work!)
  • Differences between kinds of helping professions are important – talk to us about social work, counseling, psychiatry, psychology, etc.
  • Do well in your classes, but also think about what other experiences you can aim for to make yourself competitive. Internships and supervised research are at the top of that list for psych and psych-adjacent programs! Try not to wait until your senior year – given application timelines, the earlier you can jump on experiential learning, the better.
  • Make an individualized plan, and give yourself timelines to achieve different parts of the plan. Assume that applications will start being due the November prior to any Fall start date (for instance- want to start Fall 2025? Assume your materials should be together by Nov 2024). This is a conservative timeline since some programs accept applications all the way up until April or May of the same-year start – but it ensures you are prepared.
  • Look into what the application requires. Personal statement? Get as many professional eyes on it as possible – from career service folks, but also your professors who are in the field. GRE? Many don’t require it anymore, but some do… if they do, prep for the test and don’t take it cold (don’t waste your money with the attitude of “I can always take it again”). Do you need recommendation letters? Give your letter writers plenty of time and all details about you and the places you are applying (many require 2-3 letters, some require those letters to be from professors specifically… think about who can best evaluate your ability to succeed in the program and career you are aiming for).
  • Don’t apply to the shiny named schools only – some of the best experiences will be had in programs that are not in fact on a Google-able “top 10” list.
  • If you are aiming for a career that requires licensure, be sure to think about that process in addition to the academic components, and also pay attention to state-by-state licensing rules.
  • Don’t be nervous about whether you are good enough, and if you get a rejection, don’t let it derail you. It’s a numbers game that doesn’t always land in your favor and is often not at all about you. Shake off the imposter syndrome! What feels hard now will help you improve your future life.

Dr. Cate provides insightful tips, and personal experience, regarding Ph.D. programs:

  • Attending a Ph.D. program is free, in the sense that 1) you don’t pay tuition, and 2) you usually get paid a very modest stipend.  The stipend is almost always in return for teaching courses as a teaching assistant, or doing similar work (such as research assistant for your advisor).  I didn’t know this at first when I was in college, and it ended up having a big influence on my decision to get a Ph.D. versus another kind of degree.
  • The best thing you can do when applying to Ph.D. programs is to have some kind of personal contact with a faculty member.  Applying to Ph.D. programs is not at all like applying to college.  When it comes down to it, you will be accepted by one individual faculty member at your school, and not by a committee.  This means that someone has to know your name, either because your application materials are outstanding, or because they talked with/read an email/heard about you.
  • Actually, even if your application is outstanding, there is no guarantee that anyone will read it, so I can’t emphasize getting your name into faculty inboxes enough.  I think a great way to introduce yourself is to send a brief message to interesting-looking faculty, asking them whether they are planning to accept graduate students this year.  (Do this before applications are due.)  You don’t necessarily need to say anything else about yourself (but it wouldn’t hurt!).  The point is to get the faculty member familiar with your name so that they will make the effort to look over your application later.  Your application will have good things in it, and you will want people to read it! 
  • Even if you’re not sure whom you would like to be your advisor yet, it’s good to get in touch with someone.  When I worked at Virginia Tech, I accepted a great grad student based on the recommendation of a colleague who had read their application and thought we were a good match. 

A couple addition notes:

Juniors – Fall Break can be a great time to begin researching graduate programs, even if you aren’t applying until next year. Plan on talking with your advisors after Fall Break about what’s involved in applying to graduate school or what would be helpful to do to prepare for a job after graduation.

All – Please reach out to your advisors or other college faculty and staff if you would like more support in your post-graduate decisions and endeavors. Roanoke College is intended to get you to graduate, but we also want each of you to succeed for years to come. Please utilize the resources available to you and speak with your experienced and knowing advisors/professors/PLACE staff, etc.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

DR. POWELL, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT, HAS BEEN PUBLISHED!

Our very own Dr. Powell has been published! Her collaborative work entitled, “A Longitudinal Examination of Mothers’ Early Postnatal Adaptation: Relative Stability Across the First Eight Weeks” was published just last week after a review period of two years. Dr. Powell has definitely earned our congratulations both for her achievement, and her patience! Please read the abstract below, or view the article here.

Abstract:

Objective

Using person-centered analyses, this study examined the trajectories of women’s early postnatal adaptation and explored whether there were differences in their trajectories based on women’s status as a first-time or more experienced mother.

Methods

Data were collected from women (N = 137; Mage = 28.6 years, SD = 4.49; 48.2% first-time mothers) at 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-weeks postpartum. At each wave of data collection, mothers reported on their parenting self-efficacy, parenting satisfaction, anxiety, parenting stress, and depressive feelings.

Results

The creation of an amalgamated measure of postnatal adaptation demonstrated acceptable fit. Latent class growth analysis revealed four distinct trajectories of postnatal adaptation; two revealed stability across the early postnatal period and two had relative stability except for a change between weeks four to six. Women’s parity was not associated with differences in their trajectories.

Conclusions for Practice

These findings reiterate the importance of collecting data from women in the early postnatal period and identifying if a woman is struggling in those early weeks, as the women in our sample demonstrated relative stability in their postnatal adaptation across the first eight weeks. Furthermore, the findings suggest that work should be taken to dismantle the commonly held belief that parenting is “easier” after having already navigated the early postnatal period with an infant once before.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

The Marcus Alert Program: Providing Roanoke Valley Officers with More Resources in Handling Mental Health Crises

Mental health crises have always been a difficult issue for law enforcement to address. However, with the recent introduction of the Marcus Alert Program in the Roanoke Valley, police officers now have additional tools to help them better assess and respond to calls related to mental health crises.

The Marcus Alert Program is a statewide system designed to improve responses to mental and behavioral health crises using therapists to assist police. It was named after Marcus-David Peters, a young Black man who was shot and killed by police amid a mental health crisis in 2018. The implementation of the program began in 2020, and the Roanoke region launched the program on July 1 of this year.

The Blue Ridge Behavioral Healthcare CSB oversees the counties of Roanoke, Botetourt and Craig, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton, and their Marcus Alert team has already responded to 160 scenes since the program’s launch. The team consists of five clinicians, or co-response therapists, who are trained to respond to mental health crises if requested by a police officer. Clinicians can provide an in-person response, a telephone consult, or resources for follow-up within 72 hours of the initial call.

While the program has been met with an “overwhelmingly positive” response from Roanoke Valley residents, it is only the beginning. The New River Valley CSB is also planning to launch the Marcus Alert Program by July 1, 2024, and the General Assembly has plans to implement the program across the entire state by 2028.

Mental health crises are a difficult issue to address, and the implementation of the Marcus Alert Program is a big step in the right direction towards providing better resources and assistance to those in need. For more information, read the article posted here.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Explore & Grow at Camp Easterseals! 🌟

Looking for a transformative experience in the realm of psychology and human development? Welcome to Camp Easterseals, located in the picturesque Blue Ridge Mountains near Roanoke, Virginia. It’s more than just a camp; it’s a hub for personal and professional growth, catering to children and adults with diverse disabilities.

 Camp Easterseals Staff Brochur1.pdf

A Unique Learning Opportunity 📘

Camp Easterseals is a sanctuary of learning, fun, and connections, where students interested in psychology can gain invaluable hands-on experience by serving people with disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, and Down syndrome, enriching their understanding of human spirit and behavior.

Upcoming Event: Halloween-Themed Weekend 🎃

Join us from October 27th to 29th, 2023, for a Halloween-themed weekend filled with activities like horseback riding, archery, arts and crafts, and dancing! We’re inviting volunteers and staff to be a part of this joyful journey and help us create unforgettable experiences for our campers.

Why Join Us? 🌿

– Experience life-changing insights and personal growth.

– Gain practical exposure and embellish your resume.

– Forge lasting bonds and create cherished memories.

– Receive comprehensive training and earn letters of recommendation.

Camp Easterseals is not just about learning; it’s about experiencing the joy of making a difference and embarking on a journey of self-discovery and professional development. Join us and be a part of a world where compassion meets fun, and learning meets fulfillment.

Here is the link to the weekend staff application (it pays!) if anyone is interested. 
^link in case the hyperlink doesn’t work: https://recruiting.ultipro.com/EAS1015EUCP/JobBoard/0f0249a6-0416-453f-b54d-24dda355daf1/OpportunityDetail?opportunityId=832ded22-cf3f-4ab7-9cda-a275f6d04165&sourceId=cc194bec-a059-4034-bc14-2ec5a81d18b9 

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Unveiling the Journey of a Roanoke College Psychology Student: Navigating Research, Success, and the Pursuit of Knowledge

Roanoke College is a hub of academic excellence, nurturing young minds to realize their full potential. Among its many accomplished students, one stands out: a psychology major with a passion for understanding human development. Meet Raegan Middlethon, whose journey at Roanoke College is an inspiring testament to the pursuit of knowledge, research excellence, and the desire to make a difference.

A Passion for Psychology

Raegan, a psychology major with a concentration in human development, has always been drawn to the complexities of the human mind. She eloquently describes her fascination with psychology, stating, “When it comes to psychology, I like learning a little bit of everything.” This curiosity has driven her to explore diverse topics within the field, from social relationships and development to the effects of drugs on the brain and psychophysiology.

Research Endeavors

A defining aspect of Raegan’s Roanoke College experience has been her involvement in research. She has worked closely with Dr. Buchholz since her junior year, embarking on a journey to study parasocial relationships (PSRs). These one-sided bonds that humans form with celebrities, athletes, or fictional characters intrigued her. Her dedication led to the presentation of their findings at a conference in Washington, D.C.

Following this success, Raegan and Dr. Buchholz turned their attention to the ever-evolving influence of TikTok, exploring its impact on society and individual well-being. Her commitment to research extends to her membership in Dr. Powell’s lab, where she investigates how watching videos of children playing on YouTube influences creativity, imagination, and parent-child relationships.

Summer Scholars Program

Raegan reflects on her participation in the Summer Scholars program as a pivotal experience. She relished the opportunity to delve deeply into her research without the distraction of regular coursework. “I really enjoyed being able to focus on my research without thinking about a bunch of other things, like my class assignments,” she says. This immersive experience offered valuable insights into her own work habits and academic strategies.

A Morehead Winner

Her journey at Roanoke College took an unexpected turn when Raegan became a Morehead winner. She modestly recalls, “I actually didn’t think I was a Morehead winner for a few months, so it was a big surprise when I got the email!” Her recognition as a Morehead winner is a testament to her dedication and echoes the legacy of President John Morehead, who did so much for the college.

Convocation Speaker

Raegan’s journey also led her to the prestigious role of being a convocation speaker, an experience she describes as a “great honor.” She recognizes that her story may have seemed cheesy to her freshman self, but she hopes it inspired others to explore their potential. “Any psychology major will tell you that humans have the tendency to underestimate a lot of things, including ourselves,” she wisely observes.

Future Aspirations

As Raegan approaches her graduation date in May 2024, she has big dreams for the future. She is currently in the process of applying to several PhD programs, a testament to her unwavering commitment to research and making a difference in the world of psychology. Her vision is clear: “I’d like to produce research dealing with children and adolescents that helps inform clinicians, schools, parents, and policy makers.” Furthermore, she aspires to become a professor one day, potentially even returning to Roanoke College to inspire future generations of students.

In conclusion, Raegan’s journey as a psychology student at Roanoke College is a remarkable story of dedication, curiosity, and a relentless pursuit of knowledge. Her research endeavors, accolades, and future aspirations reflect the caliber of students Roanoke College fosters. As she continues to make strides in the field of psychology, we can only anticipate the positive impact she will have on the world.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Attention Juniors & Seniors in Psychology: Check Out These Resources!

Stay informed and be on the look out for resources and opportunities! The following newsletters have information regarding research, internships, conferences, and graduate school. Joining newsletters and remaining informed is one of the best tools that you can arm yourself with as an undergraduate students. Make the most of your time and attention!

Psychology Student Network (PSN) newsletter – Free online newsletter with articles and announcements for psychology students. Recent articles have focused on undergraduate researchinternships, and applying to graduate school.

Psychology Student Network (PSN) listserv – A listserv for sharing more time-sensitive announcements about opportunities for internships, undergraduate research opportunities, and undergraduate conferences.  Interested students may join through this link.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand, Associate Professor in Psychology Department, Has Been Published!

Dr. FVN has now been published for her collaborative work entitled “Is Bullying Always about Status? Status Goals, Forms of Bullying, Popularity and Peer Rejection during Adolescence”. Congratulations Dr. FVN, we are so proud to say you are a Roanoke College professor! Please read the abstract of her work below, or visit the article here.

Abstract: Bullying has been associated with status goals among peers, but this research has not distinguished among forms of bullying, nor included actual status or popularity among peers in an integrated analysis. To this aim, in concurrent correlational data, we examined adolescent status goals as predictors of peer-reported physical, verbal, exclusionary and electronic bullying, and these further as predictors of popularity and peer rejection (N = 256; 67.2% girls; M age = 12.2 years). We also explored potential indirect associations of status goals with popularity and peer rejection via forms of bullying. The findings indicated that verbal bullying was the most common form of bullying. Status goals were positively related to all but physical bullying, yet only verbal bullying partially mediated this association with popularity. Electronic bullying was unrelated to popularity and peer rejection, when controlling for other bullying forms (but was positively related to rejection at the bi-variate level). The findings underscore the importance of assessing bullying as a heterogeneous construct, as related goals and adjustment among peers may depend on its specific form.

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Introducing Dr. Michael Love, Psy.D. Enriching Roanoke College’s Psychology Department!

Roanoke College is thrilled to welcome a new addition to its esteemed Psychology Department, Dr. Michael Love Psy.D. With an impressive academic background, a passion for teaching, and a unique blend of research interests, Dr. Love promises to be a valuable asset to both the faculty and students at Roanoke College.

Educational Journey

Dr. Love’s journey in the field of psychology began with his undergraduate studies at Virginia Tech, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2002. He later pursued his Doctorate in Psychology (Psy.D.) in counseling psychology at Radford University, successfully completing his degree in 2015.

One of the highlights of his academic journey was his dissertation, a longitudinal study on opioid injection rates among rural and urban adolescents and adults. Under the guidance of his advisor, Dr. Tracy Cohn, Dr. Love’s research yielded intriguing results which can be found at http://wagner.radford.edu/id/eprint/229

Professional Experience

Dr. Love completed his residency at Virginia Tech’s counseling center from 2015 to 2016, then became a staff psychologist, developing a passion for working with students. During this time, he led Interpersonal Processing-Based Group Therapy and played a pivotal role in establishing a unique therapeutic gaming group. In this innovative program, individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder learned valuable social skills through the popular game, Dungeons and Dragons, focusing on perspective-taking and frustration management.

His teaching experience, acquired during his time in graduate school at Radford University and later at Boston University, paved the way for his decision to join the Roanoke College faculty. Dr. Love was deeply impressed by the level of student engagement and passion for interactive learning that he encountered on campus, making Roanoke College his preferred choice for nurturing the next generation of psychologists.

Courses at Roanoke College

Dr. Love is currently teaching multiple of courses at Roanoke College, including PSYC101 – Introduction to Psychology, PSYC384 – Abnormal Psychology, and INQ120 – Social Media: Influence and Health. His interactive teaching style and commitment to engaging with students promise an enriching educational experience for all who have the privilege of attending his classes.

Beyond the Classroom

Outside of his academic pursuits, Dr. Love has a diverse set of interests that reflect his multifaceted personality. He is an avid gardener, an enthusiastic chef, and a talented audio engineer. These passions not only enrich his personal life but also contribute to his holistic approach to psychology and learning.

While he is not currently accepting research assistants this semester, Dr. Love looks forward to involving students in his research endeavors in 2024. His wide range of research interests holds the promise of exciting opportunities for students eager to explore the world of psychology through hands-on experiences.

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PRINCETON REVIEW NAMES ROANOKE COLLEGE A “GREAT SCHOOL FOR PSYCH MAJORS”!

Continuing a streak, Roanoke College has been featured as a Great School For Psych Majors by the Princeton Review! The psychology department has been recognized by the best colleges guide every year since the book’s 2015 edition.

The full story can be found here: https://www.roanoke.edu/news/princeton_review_2023

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Virtual APA Psychology Graduate School Fair

The APA Education Directorate is pleased to announce that the first Virtual APA Psychology Graduate School Fair is happening on Thursday, November 2nd from noon-6pm (Eastern)! Registration for all prospective psychology graduate students is FREE, and psychology graduate programs that wish to recruit at this event can register for a modest fee.

The goal of the APA Psychology Graduate School Fair is to virtually connect graduate psychology programs with a diverse group of students, including current undergraduates, graduate students seeking to further their education beyond their current degree, and individuals returning for their graduate education. The APA Psychology Graduate School Fair is open to all graduate psychology degree (MA/MS/PsyD/PhD/EdD/Other) granting institutions in the U.S. and Canada, and all areas of psychology are encouraged to participate, including health service psychology, scientific and applied psychology, and general psychology programs.

Students who register will have the opportunity to meet virtually with recruiters from any of the participating programs. Individuals can come for a short time and meet with a select few recruiters or stay for the whole event and meet with everyone, depending on their schedule and interest. To learn more and to register for the event, visit https://www.careereco.com/events/APA.

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Introducing Dr. Wen Bu: A New Addition to Our Psychology Faculty

Dr. Wen Bu

Roanoke College is proud to welcome Dr. Wen Bu as a new addition to our esteemed psychology faculty! Dr. Bu brings a wealth of experience and expertise to our academic community, making her a valuable asset to both students and colleagues.

Educational Journey

Dr. Bu’s academic journey is an impressive one, demonstrating her dedication to knowledge and her commitment to personal growth. She began her undergraduate studies at Furman University in South Carolina, where she pursued a double major in Political Science and Chemistry. This diverse academic background laid the foundation for her multidisciplinary approach to psychology.

After completing her undergraduate studies, Dr. Bu earned her Law Degree from Harvard in 2008. She gained valuable experience working as a clerk for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and later the O’Melveney & Myers Law Firm. However, she soon realized that her true passion lie elsewhere.

Driven by her deep interest in psychology, Dr. Bu decided to pursue a Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota, which she successfully completed in 2021. Her dissertation, guided by dual advisors Dr. Gene Borgida and Dr. Chris Federico, explored the intricate dynamics of racial and person of color identity and solidarity.

Postdoctoral Research

Following the completion of her Ph.D., Dr. Bu continued her academic journey with a postdoctoral position at Indiana University. Under the mentorship of Dr. Mary Murphy, she delved into the study of college students’ sense of belonging and the critical role that faculty and institutional mindset play in shaping the student experience.

Passion for Teaching

One of the compelling reasons Dr. Bu chose to join the Roanoke College community is her deep passion for teaching. She discovered her love for the classroom during her graduate studies and recognized that Roanoke’s small class sizes would provide her with the opportunity to truly engage with and support her students. Moreover, the proximity of Roanoke College to her hometown in Atlanta, Georgia, made this a perfect fit for her academic journey.

Diverse Interests

Beyond her academic pursuits, Dr. Bu is a multifaceted individual with a wide array of hobbies. She enjoys immersing herself in theater, singing in the choir, exploring the world of dungeons and dragons, mastering the art of knitting, and gliding gracefully in the ice skating rink.

Current Roles and Future Prospects

Currently, Dr. Bu is sharing her expertise with Roanoke College students by teaching PSYC 251 – Social Psychology and PSYC 204 – Quantitative Methods in Psychology. Her research interests span a wide spectrum, including intergroup relations, social identity, identity threat, stereotypes and prejudice, political psychology, and psychology in law.

While she is not currently accepting student research assistants, Dr. Bu has plans to engage students in her research endeavors starting in the spring of 2024, providing a valuable opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience in the field.

Roanoke College is privileged to have Dr. Wen Bu as a valuable member of our psychology faculty. Her diverse academic background, dedication to teaching, and passion for research make her a remarkable addition to our community. We look forward to the contributions she will make to the field of psychology and the positive impact she will have on our students’ academic journeys. Welcome, Dr. Bu!

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Honors Defense: Kristi Rolf

Huge congratulations to senior Kristi Rolf who successfully defended her Honors in Psychology project on April 26th!

Kristi Rolf ’23 poses with her presentation after a successful defense

Kristi’s project was titled Sense of Purpose in College Students: Connections with Support and Descriptions of Purpose Development. During the defense, her advisor Dr. Findley Van Nostrand was joined by committee members Dr. Powell and Professor Chapman of the Modern Languages Department.

Kristi will be graduating with honors on May 6th 2023. Congratulations Kristi!

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Honors Defense: Skyler Pokorny

Huge congratulations to senior Skyler Pokorny who successfully defended her honors project on Wednesday April 26th!

Skyler Pokorny ’23 poses with her Honors in Psychology t-shirt after a successful defense

Skyler’s project was titled Experimental Manipulation of Self-Concept Clarity in Emerging Adults. During the defense, Skyler’s project advisor Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand was joined by committee members Dr. Allen and Dr. Berenson of the Religion and Philosophy department .

Skyler will be graduating with honors on May 6th, 2023. Congratulations Skyler!

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Spring ’23 Poster Session

It’s been a busy year as usual for RC Psych! On Thursday April 20th, the Psychology Department took over the first floor of Fintel Library for the Spring 2023 poster session! Students, faculty, and staff from across campus gathered to hear psychology students present their research and experiential learning experiences.

Scroll on for photos from the day and visit us on social media to congratulate our hard-working students!

Fintel Library buzzes with presenters
Seminar students present their project Effect of Mood on Recall: (L to R) Alex Jaklitsch, Anna Arnold, Lindsay Jones, & Haley Patterson, class of 2023.
Seminar students (L to R) Emma Kalinski, Amanda Nakdimen, Noal cheru, & Morgan Micallef present their seminar project titled Heart Rate Variability: Coherence Between Heart Rate and Breathing.
Seniors (L to R) Isabelle Mildonian, Ciara Fadeley, Taelor Quick, & Kynston Boyd present their seminar project titled Increased Desire for socialization with stronger Social Support and higher Need to Belong.
Seniors (L to R) Rhianna Chambers, Skyler Pokorny, Kelsey McCown, & Macallan Bonser present their research, Emerging Adults and Media.
Seniors (L to R) Kosovare Fetinci, Kristi Rolf, Logan Pasley, & Alexis Wright present their study titled Perceptions of Crime & Mental Illness.
Senior Kosovare Fetinci presents her independent study titled Friendship Dissolution and its Impacts.
Senior Lauryn Chappell (second from left) presents a study titled von Restorff Effect: examining perceptual memory recall accuracy of college students to Dr. Carter with team members Pete Nichols (left) and Ameen Oliver (right) .
Senior Morgan Kelly (left) presents her internship experience at H2 Health.
Seniors (L to R) Elayna Jennings, Sariah Steele, Huda Hashash, Maryam Nishtar, and Devin Brown present their study titled Effect of Task Difficulty and Anxiety on HRV.
Senior Selam Mekonnen presents her study titled The Impact of Pluralistic Ignorance on Gender Bias
Dr. Powell and Dr. Allen learn about student research.

It’s been a great year of research and experiential learning for RC Psych! We can’t wait to see how these students apply their skills in the future.

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Academic Awards in Psychology 2023

On Tuesday April 18th, the psychology department was proud to recognize the accomplishments of our fantastic students. In the annual ceremony, twelve students received special recognition for their achievements in psychology through eight awards, and Psi Chi the Psychology Honor Society inducted new members. Read on to learn about this year’s awardees!

Senior Scholar in Psychology

Skyler Pokorny, 2023 Senior Scholar in Psychology

The senior scholar in psychology is the student with the highest GPA in Psychology courses. Ties are broken by highest GPA across all Roanoke College Courses. Congratulations to Skyler Pokorny for winning the title this year!

Charles E. Early Award

Isabelle Mildonian (left), 2023 Charles E. Early Award Recipient. and Dr. Buchholz (right).

The Charles E. Early award is granted in honor of Dr. Charles E. Early, retired Professor of Psychology who taught at Roanoke from 1988-2015. The award goes to the student who best embodies Dr. Early’s love of learning, powerful work ethic, keen intellect, warm humor, and deep appreciation for pie. This year’s recipient is Isabelle Mildonian. Congratulations Isabelle!

Curt R. Camac Student Research Award

Devin Brown (left) and Kristi Rolf (right). Not pictured: Maryam Nishtar

The Curt R. Camac Student Research Award was developed to honor Dr. Curt R. Camac’s support of student research. This year’s recipients were Devin Brown, Maryam Nishtar, and Kristi Rolf. Congratulations to all!

Jan H. Lynch Human Development Concentration Award

Left to right: Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand, Caroline Powell, Kosovare Fetinci, and Dr. Powell.

The Jan H. Lynch Human Development Concentration award is granted to a student who has demonstrated excellence in the Human Development Concentration. This year’s awardees are Caroline Powell and Kosovare Fetinci. Congratulations Caroline and Kosovare!

Karl W. Beck Award

Allyson Herriges, 2023 Karl W. Beck Awardee

The Karl W. Beck award is granted to a student with demonstrated excellence in psychology. This year’s awardee is Allyson Herriges. Congratulations Allyson!

Outstanding Students in Neuroscience Concentration

Outstanding Neuroscience Students Jarod Le (left) and Allyson Herriges (left) with Neuroscience Concentration coordinator Dr. Nichols (center).

This award is granted to students who demonstrate excellence in the Neuroscience Concentration. Congratulations to the 2023 recipients, Jarod Le and Allyson Herriges!

Outstanding Junior Psychology Majors

Left to right: Reagan Middelthon, Hannah Pluim, Sophia Contini, and Brian Schwenk

Seven juniors were recognized for outstanding academic success and potential for continued success in Psychology. Awardees were (pictured above) Reagan Middelthon, Hannah Pluim, Sophia Contini, Brian Shwenk; and (not pictured) Elizabeth Bain, Ciara Fadeley, and Timothy Hoffstaetter.

Psi Chi Achievement Award

Psi Chi Achievement Awardee Kristi Rolf (left) & Psi Chi Faculty Advisor Dr. Kennedy-Metz (right).

The Psi Chi Achievement Award is granted to a Psi CHi member who has best exemplified excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service. Chosen by faculty members in Psi Chi, the 2023 awardee is Kristi Rolf. Congratulations!

Psi Chi New Member Induction

Spring 2023 inductees of Psi Chi

Psi Chi also inducted students who have met the academic qualifications for membership in the Honorary Psychology Honor Society. Congratulations to all new members!

It’s been a fantastic year for RC Psychology and we are so proud of our students! Special congratulations and best wishes to the Class of 2023 as they head off into their future endeavors post-graduation.

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Honors Defense: Allyson Herrigies

Huge congratulations to senior Allyson Herriges who successfully defended her honors project on Tuesday April 18th!

Allyson Herriges ’23 prepares to defend her Honors in Psychology project.
She is joined by her son, Andrew, who has a neurodevelopmental disorder.

Allyson’s project was titled Evaluating the Impact of Zofran Exposure on Embryonic Neural Development in Zebrafish Using a Multi-Method Approach. During the defense, Allyson’s project advisor Dr. Drea was joined by committee members Dr. Lassiter and Dr. Kennedy-Metz.

Below is the abstract from Allyson’s paper:

“Ondansetron, commonly known as Zofran, is commonly prescribed as an antiemetic to pregnant females experiencing severe morning sickness. Zofran is often only given when the mother’s malnutrition poses a much greater risk to the fetus than exposure to the drug. While the drug may cause morphological abnormalities in development, relatively little has been done to examine gene expression changes. In this study we identified four genes (shank3a, shank3b, gabra1, and hgma2) with important links to neural development and, using Danio rerio, evaluated the expression of these genes after embryos were exposed to Zofran in the early stages of development. We also looked at behavioral development, including tail-flips, startle response, and optical response. Preliminary qPCR analysis has shown dysregulation in the specified genes. Embryos exposed to Zofran at laboratory levels showed a significant increase in tail-flipping at 28hpf, with a downward trend correlating to exposure level. These findings may offer insight into potential correlations to neurodevelopmental disorders, like autism spectrum disorder and ADHD, in children of mothers who used the drug while pregnant, and in turn allow doctors to better treat these conditions.”

Allyson will be graduating with honors on May 6th, 2023. Congratulations, Allyson!

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Why Psych? Psychology Week 2023

April 23-29 2023 is Psychology Week, a campaign from the American Psychological Association (APA). In honor of the week, we are highlighting some of the amazing people in the Roanoke College Psychology Department.

We asked two students and a faculty member to share their answer to the question, “Why Psychology?”

Timothy Hoffstaetter ’24

Timothy Hoffstaetter ’24, Psychology Major

Why psychology?

I choose to study psychology because of my passion for helping and uplifting others. Being educated on this subject allows for me to help others live their best and truest life. I also want to shoutout my sister because even though she is not in the field of psychology she inspires me every day to live my life by helping people. 

Dr. Christopher Buchholz

Dr. Christopher Buchholz, Associate Professor of Psychology

Why psychology?

I was drawn to psychology in a search for an answer to big questions like, What is consciousness? Do we have free will? How can we best live happy and meaningful lives? What I love about psychology and the human experience is that I am still learning new answers to these questions. I find joy in that search as well as in sharing what I have learned with others. 

Allyson Herriges ’23

Allyson Herriges ’23, Psychology Major (right) and her son (left)

Why psychology?

I chose to study psychology because I’m the mother of an autistic child. Through my studies I’ve been able to develop a better understanding of the disorder and have become a better parent as a result. I hope to spend my life researching the neurological basis of autism while also helping families like my own navigate the world, and make it a more autism-friendly place.

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Dr. Buchholz Selected for Dean’s Exemplary Service Award 2022-2023

Congratulations are in order for Dr. Buchholz who received the Roanoke College Dean’s Exemplary Service Award last week.

Dr. Christopher Buchholz

The annual Dean’s awards are granted based on nominations from the college community and include awards for exemplary teaching professional life, and service.

“The Dean’s Exemplary Service Award recognizes outstanding faculty service – either at Roanoke College or in the larger community – in ways that advance the mission of the College in seeking to develop students as whole persons and prepare them for lives of purpose and meaning.  Professional service may involve many factors, such as the number, quality, range or focus of service activities; honors or awards received from off-campus organizations; and the time invested relative to the time available for service activities.”

The announcement from the Dean last week highlighted the incredible dedication Dr. Buchholz shows to the College through service:

“This year’s Dean’s Exemplary Service Award recipient (…) lives and breathes Roanoke College and models to others [the] pillar of service. He currently serves on —count them–nine different college-wide committees, task forces, and groups, along with being a Faculty Marshal. This doesn’t even count the myriad service opportunities he participates in within his department.” 

Dr. Powell, Interim Chair of the Psychology Department, stated: “In each of these endeavors, he is thoughtful – considering the needs of the students and the resources of the college; is reliable – if he says he’s going to do it, he does it in an exceptionally timely manner; and is diligent – ensuring all facets are accounted for and completed appropriately.” 

Another colleague commented: “I have also observed (…) him being a stabilizing agent – consistently working to consider, respect, and understand various perspectives on a range of issues, and modeling such behavior not only to students, but also to junior faculty who are themselves striving to serve students.” 

The psychology department is proud to have Dr. Buchholz on our faculty. His dedication has impacted countless colleagues and students and we can’t thank him enough. Congratulations, Dr. Buchholz, and thank you for your service to our community!

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Honors Defense: Devin Brown

Huge congratulations to senior Devin Brown who successfully defended her honors project on Tuesday April 11th!

Devin Brown ’23 poses with her Honors in Psychology t-shirt after a successful defense

Devin’s project was titled The Pen is Mightier than the Brain: the Cognitive and Social Psychology Behind the Handwriting Legibility Effect. During the defense, Devin’s project advisor Dr. Carter was joined by committee members Dr. Kennedy-Metz and Dr. Brenzovich.

Below is the abstract from Devin’s paper:

The handwriting legibility effect suggests that the quality of handwriting can affect the grades that are assigned to student papers. There are both cognitive and personality based theories that give a basis for why this occurs, but there is a lack of cohesive research testing subcomponents of these theories. This research is a controlled experiment designed to fill this gap in the current literature.  To understand how handwriting quality contributes to evaluator perception of author competency, warmth, and similarity, these personality components were considered. For cognitive components, effort to read the essay, truthfulness of the answer, and complexity of the argument were studied. All of these were affected by the quality of handwriting the participants were exposed to except complexity. This research can be used in future studies to find and apply practical solutions to bring more equality in classroom settings for students that may have worse handwriting for a number of reasons. 

Congratulations, Devin!

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The Nutshell Games!

On Tuesday April 11th, three students from Dr. Kennedy-Metz’s psychophysiology research seminar went head-to-head in The Nutshell Games. Students had 90 second to communicate their current research project “in a nutshell” to a diverse audience of students and faculty from a variety of disciplines.

Morgan Micallef ’23

Undergraduate research is a key part of the Psychology Department’s mission. Every psychology major will conduct research in their senior seminar and more than 1 in 3 students are involved in a research lab each year.

Dr. Kennedy-Metz had a mission to teach her seminar students the importance of science communication through a fun and challenging lesson. I spoke with her about how the nutshell games came to be.

“I’ve always felt that the more high-profile (and potentially impactful) someone’s research becomes, the worse they are at communicating why it’s so important to the world.  Science communication is an essential skill that often doesn’t come naturally to us, and, to make matters worse, is chronically under-trained.  So, I felt a responsibility to emphasize the importance of science communication to students at an early stage in their career. ”

“I invited Dr. Patty Raun, Director of Virginia Tech’s Center for Communicating Science, to lead an improv day in my Research Seminar class, encouraging students to step outside of their comfort zone, embrace vulnerability, and communicate freely and meaningfully.”

Devin Brown ’23

“The goal of the subsequent Nutshell Games competition was for students to put this training to the test, and see how well they could communicate their semester-long projects in succinct, accessible terms to a non-specialist audience.  They had 90 seconds to share their research and convey its importance to the larger community, all while being judged by staff and faculty from 5+ departments across campus (including Chemistry, Psychology, Fine Arts, Music, Public Health, and Health and Human Performance).”

 Winning speaker AJ Palmer ’23 (center) is joined by team members Zoë Dunlap ’23 (left) and Allyson Herriges ’23 (right)

Dr. Kennedy-Metz invited students, faculty, and staff from a variety of backgrounds to simulate the real-world challenge of communicating science to people from a variety of backgrounds.

“One of my goals in gathering such a diverse group of staff and faculty was to showcase how difficult it is to distill a body of work and still communicate it effectively to audience members with such diverse backgrounds, along with the relevance and importance of doing so.  In the future, I hope to expand the scope of the Nutshell Games at Roanoke College to include competitors from across departments.”

We can’t wait to see how this competition grows in future years!

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D.C. Semester Highlight: Gabrielle Lirosi

Gabrielle Lirosi ’24 is spending a semester participating in the Lutheran College Washington Semester (LCWS). Gabrielle originally hails from Jackson, New Jersey and is a current junior at Roanoke College. She majors in Psychology with a minor in Sociology and a concentration in Crime, Deviance, and Social Control.

I interviewed Gabrielle to learn more about what she’s doing during her semester away!

Lirosi visiting The View of D.C. in Arlington, Virginia

This spring, Gabrielle is working for Offender Aid and Restoration (OAR) as a Post-Release Intern. OAR works to “create a community where those impacted by the legal system enjoy equal civil and human rights.” Gabrielle’s team specifically works with people who have recently been released from incarceration to help them transition back into the community.

Describing her work, Gabrielle says, “some days I am booked with appointments working with our participants to find housing, arrange community service, build job applications, practice interviews, and so much more!” Her team communicates with probation/parole officers, group home mentors, and family members of participants to help build their support system. Gabrielle also frequently attends court to stay up-to-date with participants and share OAR resources with recently-released individuals.

Positively impacting people’s lives while gaining high-level professional experience is an average day for an LCWS student. This semester, Gabrielle has been assigned the designated point-person for a large project in which OAR is assessing their recidivism rates.

Gabrielle Lirosi walks through the Federal Triangle

Gabrielle is putting her psychology background to work in the professional world! She says psychology students must consider participating in LCWS.

“So many focus on DC as the capital only seeing politics and ignoring the social sciences that reside in such a complex society! I’ve applied endless amounts of psychology work into analyzing the culture of DC and understanding my work at OAR! There are ample opportunities for any major, including psychology.”

According to Gabrielle, the networking and mentoring opportunities available for all students in D.C. are invaluable.

Gabrielle Lirosi ’24 with roommates Sierra Smith (Augustana University ’23. left) and Natalie Webster (Roanoke College ’25, right)

When she isn’t in class or working at OAR, Gabrielle is soaking up the culture of the nation’s capital! She loves making spontaneous plans with her roommates (pictured above). “There has never been a dull moment exploring the city,” she says, but it’s easy to find peace and quiet in one of D.C.’s many parks.

When I asked Gabrielle what her favorite memory from the semester so far is, she said, “seeing the cherry blossoms at sunrise was surreal, they are a token of DC and are in peak bloom right now.” But the famous cherry blossoms are tied with the interactive art of the Artech House for most memorable to Gabrielle.

Want to learn more about LCWS? Visit https://www.washingtonsemester.org/ or contact Dr. Todd Peppers (peppers@roanoke.edu) for more information!

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Psych Students at President’s Ball 2023

On Saturday March 18th, Roanoke College students, faculty, and staff gathered at the Cregger Center for the annual President’s Ball. The college community had a blast dressing up and dancing. This year’s event was notable as the first President’s Ball during the term of President Frank Shushok.

Many psychology students were spotted enjoying the evening. Enjoy these pictures of #PsychRC at Roanoke’s biggest night of the year!

Allyson Herriges ’23 (left)
Maryam Nishtar ’23 (second from right)
Megan onofrei ’24 (front row, second from left)
Sophia Contini ’24 (middle)
Timothy Hoffstaetter ’24 (second from left)
Kristi Rolf ’23 (left)

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D.C. Semester Highlight: Megan Onofrei

Megan Onofrei ’24 is spending her semester in the U.S. capital by participating in the Lutheran College Washington Semester (LCWS) program. A junior from Mesa, Arizona, Onofrei majors in Political Science with a minor in Psychology. Outside of the classroom, she plays defense for Roanoke College Women’s Soccer.

Megan Onofrei ’24 enjoys time on the National Mall

The Lutheran College Washington Semester allows Roanoke students to live and study in Washington D.C. while gaining professional experience through an internship. Onofrei is currently interning at the Normandy Group, a government relations firm.

Onofrei describes her internship as “well organized but also flexible and highly interactive.” Interning at the Normandy Group, Onofrei is “involved in all aspects of the firm’s responsibilities” but she notes that “I also retain the opportunity to attend Congressional hearings or networking events throughout the day that are related to the clients and projects that I am a part of.” This keeps her days “exciting and busy!”

Onofrei and roommate Jocelyn Snader ’24 attend the Senate Judiciary Committee Hearing

Onofrei’s time in D.C. has been saturated with politics, but her psychology studies have been relevant throughout. She says,

“the concepts that I have learned about in Social Psychology apply directly to the interactions that I have with work colleagues or other professionals. On a larger scale, I have seen the reality of psychological phenomena that is a driver for certain decisions made by Congress.”

The Washington semester is open to students from any major, and any type of internship can can be completed for credit! Onofrei says “psychology students should definitely consider participating in the Washington Semester because there is a lot of networking and interpersonal interaction available here!” This experiential learning and career experience will set any student apart as they prepare for graduate school or the workforce.

Onofrei and fellow LCWS students on a field trip the the Library of Congress

Professional experiences abound at LCWS! On a recent LCWS field trip, Onofrei and other students toured the Library of Congress, pictured above. Onofrei has also attended hearings of the House Oversight Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee. She says, “I have plans to sit in a Supreme Court Oral Argument later on in the semester, an opportunity that I am extremely excited for!”

Outside of the work day, LCWS provides ample opportunity to explore the nation’s capital. Onofrei has enjoyed exploring monuments and memorials, taking in the architecture of D.C., and hitting up the culinary scene by trying new coffee shops and restaurants. But her favorite recreation so far has been visiting D.C. suburbs like Alexandria and Georgetown, “it is very relaxing to walk along these long brick-lined streets, full of shops and beautiful architecture.”

Want to learn more about LCWS? Visit https://www.washingtonsemester.org/ or contact Dr. Todd Peppers (peppers@roanoke.edu) for more information!

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Psych Students Elected to Phi Beta Kappa

Last week, two Psychology majors were elected to join Phi Beta Kappa, the country’s oldest and most prestigious academic honor society. Seniors Allyson Herriges and Caroline Powell were recognized for outstanding achievement in the liberal arts and sciences.

To be eligible for membership in PBK, college students must complete a wide berth of coursework beyond requirements for their major, study a language and math or statistics, and be determined to have good moral character. Read more details about membership requirements here!

Phi Beta Kappa nominees from the 2022/2023 school year will be inducted at a formal ceremony on May 5th 2023, the day before commencement.

Congratulations Allyson and Caroline! The psychology department is proud to recognize your achievement and wishes you the best of luck after graduation.

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Job Opportunity: Strategic Therapy Associates

Attention upcoming graduates and recent alumni! If you are seeking employment that would lead towards licensure and are enthusiastic about working with children and families, Strategic Therapy Associates has position openings you may be eligible for.

Strategic Therapy Associates provides family therapy services to at-risk children and their families across Central and Southwest Virginia. We have offices in Lynchburg, Farmville Richmond, Danville, Halifax, Martinsville, Roanoke, Lexington and Wytheville, Virginia. They are seeking candidates who have completed or will soon complete a master’s degree in Counseling, Social Work or Marriage & Family Therapy.  All clinicians offered employment must be able to register as a Resident in Counseling, Resident in Marriage & Family Therapy or Supervisee in Social Work with the VA Board of Health Professionals to receive clinical supervision towards professional licensure as an LPC, LMFT or LCSW.

They use a Strategic Family Therapy systems approach in our work with clients and are seeking therapists who are interested in learning solution-focused interventions.  Applicants should be interested in working with at-risk children and families in their homes where they will learn how to uncover the family’s strengths and abilities to solve their own problems, where our therapist motivates clients to implement positive changes. All therapists receive extensive training and weekly supervision.

Here is a link to the company page and a list of open positions:

 http://s614510739.initial-website.com/

REU Opportunity: Paid Summer Research in Missouri

Looking for something to do with your summer? You can get paid while conducting research and building a competitive CV for grad school applications! The University of Missouri is hosting a Paid Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) this summer. Read on for details about the program and how to apply!

Scientific Study of Interpersonal Relationships Across the Lifespan

The scientific study of interpersonal relationships over the lifespan is important to our broader understanding of the human experience.  These relationships begin with our earliest interactions and continue well into later life, and through them we learn how to communicate with, trust, and support others, as well as handle conflicts and negative interactions. These relationships are also studied through a variety of different social and behavioral science disciplines, including psychology, human development, family sciences, and interpersonal communication.  Increasing interdisciplinary insights into how close relationships and human social networks function and impact well-being across the lifespan is important to consider in training the next generation of scholars.

The University of Missouri (MU) is hosting a new National Science Foundation REU Site* centered on the scientific theme of Close Relationships.  This nine-week on-campus summer program (8 students per summer) is centered on the interdisciplinary, lifespan developmental, and diverse nature of the scientific study of close relationships.  This REU site will take advantage of the collaborative and interactive research environment fostered by the Family and Relationships Research Network of Missouri (FARR-net) at MU.  Each undergraduate will be mentored by a primary FARR-net-affiliated faculty member from the departments of Communication, Human Development & Family Sciences, or Psychological Sciences, to design a project related to one or more primary close relationships (i.e., parent-child, sibling, friends, romantic/marital partners) from a developmentally-informed perspective. 

Who should apply?

Rising sophomore, junior, or senior undergraduates with interests in close relationships research and graduate study in any relevant social and behavioral science degree program from across the U.S. are eligible for the program.  We are particularly interested in reviewing applications from students who may not have strong research opportunities at their current institutions, as well as students who are either first-generation college students or students with minoritized identities.

How should students apply?

Applicants must complete an online application at the link below by Friday, March 31, 2023, as well as submit a CV or resume, an unofficial transcript, a one-page (250 words) description of the student’s educational and career goals, and one letter of recommendation (ideally from a faculty member at their current institution).

Application website: https://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/interpersonal-relationships-summer-research-program/

What does the program include?

The REU program site will cover admitted students’ travel to and from the University of Missouri, as well as campus lodging and meals for the entire 9 week program (Tue 5/30 – Fri 7/28, 2023).  Students will also earn a stipend of $600 per week ($5400 over the course of the summer) while participating approximately 40 hours per week in: 1) research with an individual faculty member in their area of expertise, 2) participating in weekly seminars on close relationships, as well as other areas of professional development (e.g., graduate school application preparation, competitive fellowship funding), 3) opportunities to present the research conducted, and 4) social programs sponsored by the MU Office of Undergraduate Research along with students from other on-campus summer research experiences.

QUESTIONS? Contact program coordinator, Dr. Nicole Campione-Barr, campionebarrn@umsystem.edu

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New Disabilities Studies Concentration

This year, Roanoke College has expanded their academic catalog by launching a new concentration in Disability Studies.

“the concentration was designed with an interdisciplinary approach that reflects the truth that disabilities are woven into every aspect of society.” –Roanoke College

The interdisciplinary team of faculty directing the concentration include Dr. Teresa Milbrodt, Assistant Professor of English & Communication Studies; Mrs. Frances McCutcheon, Lecturer in Biology; and Dr. Andréa Burchfield, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology.

Required courses for the concentration focus on disability theory, the lived experience of people with disabilities, elective units, and a capstone consisting of an internship or independent study.

Dr. Burchfield shares that Disability Studies “prepares students for careers in the human services where they are likely to encounter people with disabilities.” Students who aim to attend graduate programs for special education, occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, and applied behavior analysis will especially benefit from completing the concentration.

Dr. Andréa Burchfield, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology, Coordinator for Disability Studies

The concentration is also aimed at providing students with disabilities at Roanoke College a means to “better understand themselves, their disability communities, and what to expect from the world at large, while also deepening their support network here on campus.”

Prior to teaching at Roanoke College, Dr. Burchfield worked in the field by providing behavior therapy, disability education and consultation, and disability accommodation training. Her past research focused on children with autism.

She says,

“I’m motivated to educate students about disabilities after years of witnessing the systemic isolation, negative stigmas, and obstacles to accessing services that people with disabilities face. People without disabilities lack a general awareness about the challenges the disability community faces; I’d like to reduce that gap in awareness.”

Through disability studies, Dr. Burchfield hopes that students will create “positive changes for people with disabilities on campus and in their communities” and that current and prospective Roanoke students with disabilities will benefit from a stronger sense of community and belonging on campus.

The Psychology Department is excited that this valuable field of study is now represented on campus.

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Lecture Today!

Psychology students are invited to attend the lecture titled “Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience in the Era of Big Data” hosted by the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC. On February 9th at 5:30pm, Damien Fair, PA-C, Ph.D. will be speaking on this topic.

The lecture will be broadcast on Zoom and is free to attend! Click here to join the webinar.

Read on, or visit the event page for more details!

“Developmental cognitive neuroscience is being pulled in new directions by network science and big data. Brain imaging (e.g. functional MRI, functional connectivity MRI), analytical advances (e.g. graph theory, machine learning), and access to large computing resources have empowered us to collect and process neuro-behavioral data faster and in larger populations than ever before. The clinical and translational potential from these advances is unparalleled, as a better understanding of complex human brain function is best grounded in the onset of these functions during human development. Here Dr. Fair examines the state of developmental cognitive neuroscience in the era of networks and ‘big data’ and highlight the solid footing we can take forward into future discovery and real world applications.”

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Fall ’22 Poster Session

On Thursday December 8th, the Roanoke College community gathered to see psychology students present their latest research and internship experiences. This event is held at the end of every semester and always draws a crowd. As usual, Fintel library was packed with students, staff, and faculty alike to celebrate the hard work of driven psychology students.

Scroll through the photos below to see how our students enhance their learning beyond the classroom!

Fintel buzzes with excitement as students present research and internships
Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand and students listen to a presentation.
Kelsey McCown and Devin Brown speak about their recent internships.

Research

Psychology students love research! Senior seminar, honors in the major, and independent studies are just a few of many ways students conduct research under the supervision of faculty. These experiences are all presented at the poster session as seen in the pictures below.

Seminar students (left to right) Avery Jackson, Jackson Shumate, James Orphanos, Lindsay Jones, and Casey Bowles present their capstone project.
Seniors (left to right) Daniel Jewell, Morgan Bamrick, Kirra Eveland, Madison Dorn, and Allison Verbeke present their capstone project.
Seminar students (left to right) Sadie Wallace, Karen Kohler, Caroline Powell, and Mia Clary present their capstone project.
Maryam Nishtar presents her project conducted with Dr. Nichols, Physical Changes in the Brain as a Function of Clinical Dementia Ratings in Women with Alzheimer’s Disease.
Jarod Le presents his research conducted with Dr. Nichols titled Decoding the Temporal and Spatial Frequency of Time Varying Stimuli Points to Utility of Complex Cells.

HNRS 260 Projects

This semester, Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand taught an Honors-260 course titled The Psychology of Aggression. For their final project, students in the class worked in groups to create informational brochures or flyers summarizing practical applications of the topic they studied throughout the semester. In this course, students from a variety of academic backgrounds learned about the discipline of psychology and its applications.

HNRS 260 students present Psychopathology in Crime and Drug Use
HNRS 260 students present their brochure on intimate partner violence.
HNRS 260 students present Gender Differences in Aggression.
HNRS 260 students enjoy pizza while sharing their brochure about psychopathy in children.

Internships

Many students also shared the workplace experience they gained through internships during the summer or school year. A broad range of internships qualify for academic credit and prepare students for the workforce after graduation.

Morgan Michallef presents her fashion internship at Amiee Lynn in Manhattan
Logan Pasley presents her work at Youth Connect
Devin Brown presents her work at Mainstream Mental Health in Roanoke, VA

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Psychology Department Poster Session

Come have some pizza and hear about the latest research and internships conducted by psychology students in the Library on December 8th from 12-1 pm!

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Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology

Twitter: @RC_Psychology

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about

Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Kiah Coflin (’19) Honors in the Major Project Published

Kiah Coflin ’19

Kiah Coflin (’19) recently had her Honors in the Major project published in the Journal of Couple and Family Psychology. The article, titled “Comparison of emerging adults’ bid responses based on their gender and attachment” examines how individual differences in bid responses (i.e. turning toward, turning away, and turning against)  effect relationship quality and duration.

            Kiah completed this project under Dr. Darcey N. Powell, who she credits with encouraging her to become involved in research. She __ that the experiences that she gained from research – including presenting at research conferences, May Term, and the Honors in the major process were both fun and useful for her future beyond Roanoke


“It was an incredibly fun and enlightening time that shaped my undergraduate career, and certainly helped as I continued on into graduate school for my Masters. – Kiah Coflin ’19


            After graduation, Dr. Powell continued to support her through the publication process, as they worked together to edit and create manuscripts and submit for publication at various journals. Kiah graduated from Boston College with her Masters in School Counseling in Spring 2021, and has been working as a School Adjustment Counselor with hopes to continue to grow in the profession.


“I’m continually in awe of the opportunities Roanoke College has been able to provide myself and fellow graduates, and consider myself lucky to continue to have the support and guidance of the Psychology Department years beyond my leaving campus.” – Kiah Coflin ’19


Here’s the abstract for the paper:

This project explored individual differences in bid responses, focusing specifically on participant gender and attachment. Bid responses (i.e., turning toward, turning away, and turning against) have been demonstrated to predict relationship quality and duration. However, to date, individual differences have not been explored. A pilot study of college-enrolled emerging adults (N = 51) demonstrated variability in responses to the created vignettes about hypothetical interactions with a romantic partner. Participants in the main study (N = 172) were emerging adults recruited from Prolific who responded to the finalized vignettes, as well as attachment and demographic questions. Turning toward was the most endorsed response type, and participants’ responses did not differ based on their gender. Bid responses did differ based on their romantic attachment, but not on their friend or family attachments. The results reiterate that practitioners should consider clients’ romantic attachment when discussing their interactions in romantic relationships and suggest additional research examining individual differences in bid responses is warranted.

Citation is: Coflin, K., & Powell, D. N. (2022). Comparison of emerging adults’ bid responses based on their gender and attachment. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/cfp0000236

Get Connected!

Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology

Twitter: @RC_Psychology

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about

Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

RC Psychology Alum in the News

Stephanie Walsh ’14 was sworn in as a police officer in Vinton and was recently highlighted in Vinton’s weekly newspaper, which you can read here. Congratulations Stephanie!

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Get Connected!

Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology

Twitter: @RC_Psychology

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about

Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Phi Beta Kappa News: Elected Psychology Students

Congratulations to all Roanoke College students who have been elected into Phi Beta Kappa. PBK is the oldest honors society in the country and recognizes stellar students in the liberal arts and sciences who are championed in free thought. PBK is America’s most prestigious honors society, and as such, serves as the forefront of recognition in liberal arts education. The Psychology Department would like to say a special congratulations to this year’s juniors and seniors who have been selected to join PBK:

Devin Brown
Edmond Dixon
Emma Kalinski
Skyler Pokorny
Kristi Rolf
Molly Willingham
Sydney Willingham
https://stock.adobe.com/search?k=congratulations

The Psychology Department is proud of all of your hard work this semester and previous semesters! Your hard work during your college years has paid off tremendously, and for that we commend you.

Stay tuned for upcoming posts highlighting each student!

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Get Connected!

Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology

Twitter: @RC_Psychology

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about

Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

What is APA?

You may recognize the acronym APA as the citation style psychology students use to write papers. But who or what is APA and what do they do? This post is APA 101: a beginner’s guide. The American Psychological Association has a wealth of resources you should be taking advantage of as a student and professional. Read on and click the underlined links throughout this post to explore how APA can serve you!

Background

The American Psychological Association is a professional organization representing the field of psychology in the United States. Founded in 1892, today’s APA has more than 13,000 members who are professionals and students connected with the study and practice of psychology (source).

(Important note: APA could also stand for the American Psychiatric Association, a similar group which focusses on the related field of psychiatry. Try not to mix them up!)

Citations

Let’s start with the basics for college students: citations. As a student, you will use APA style for papers and projects for class. If you conduct research in undergrad, graduate school, or during your career, you will publish your findings using APA guidelines. All current American psychology research is published and presented in APA format, so it is important to understand it so you can read the latest findings in the field.

But APA citations aren’t just standard in psychology. This style is also widely used in other social sciences as well as the fields of engineering, nursing, and business.

Luckily the APA’s website has a guide for using this style. This page features sample papers, helpful tips, and instructions for formatting your work and citing your sources. Bookmark the guide so you can find it for your next project!

Psychology Student Network (PSN)

Are you an undergraduate student who loves psychology but is looking for direction? Click here to find the latest edition of Psychology Student Network (PSN), the APA’s publication just for undergraduates.

PSN articles discuss topics such as available jobs with a bachelor’s degree in psychology, undergraduate research, and tips for applying to grad school. Each bi-annual publication offers fresh content to guide you throughout your journey as a psychology student.

Grad School Hub

It’s no secret that many psychology careers require a graduate degree. If you are planning to attend graduate school, visit APA’s grad school page for information about finding and applying to graduate programs, and how to succeed once you get there.

Don’t forget to take advantage of the graduate program search tool as you prepare for the next step in your education.

Career Hub

If the student chapter of your life is coming to an end, APA is there to guide you through your career.

Start here with the career options guide to learn about potential careers in psychology. Then, read APA’s job search tips to guide you before diving into the job search tool to locate current job openings nationwide.

Media

Last but not least, on to the fun stuff! APA has a number of resources to satisfy your curiosity about all the current topics in psychology.

Speaking of Psychology is a podcast hosted by Kim Mills, the APA’s senior director of strategic external communications and public affairs. Each episode, Mills interviews psychology researchers and practitioners to highlight new research and practices in the field. You can listen to the podcast on APA’s website, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and Stitcher.

To learn about the most pressing topics that connect psychology to everyday life, check out this hub of current issues featuring articles about the biggest themes in the field today.

Finally, you can read the freshest scholarly papers on APA’s current research page. Here you can stay current on the latest findings in psychology.

The biggest takeaway from this post? You should visit the APA website! Whether you are a student, researcher, professional or just someone who thinks psychology is cool, there’s something for everyone at APA

Get Connected!

Internship Highlight: Logan Pasley

How does a Roanoke College psychology student spend spend her summer? This year, senior Logan Pasley chose to intern at Youth Connect of Virginia, serving as a Mentor and Life Skills Provider.

Pasley originally hails from Penhook, Virginia and studies psychology with a minor in sociology at Roanoke. She recently began interning with Youth Connect in her hometown, an opportunity she pursued because “I have always wanted to work with children.” Additionally, Pasley’s goal was to learn more about the foster care system and how it can be improved.

Pasley works remotely for Youth Connect in a paid position while earning course credit, a great example of the wide variety of internship opportunities for psychology majors.

As Mentor and Life Skills Provider, Pasley develops a one-on-one relationship with young clients. When meeting a new client, she learns about their background and uses the Casey Life skills assessment to evaluate “life skills in daily living, self-care, relationships, communication, respect, education, work, etc.” Pasley uses this information to design and implement a six-month plan of action for each client.

Pasley’s work with clients is very hands-on. Each session, her job is “to plan a day in which the client is exposed to activities in the community. I allow my clients to choose a specific goal or task to get accomplished throughout the day and then take them to the most appropriate location to accomplish this goal.”

This work allowed Pasley to develop important skills. She says,

“I learned a way of communicating with individuals who struggle with trauma, mental illness, and grueling circumstances.”

After a full summer of working with Youth Connect, Pasley took the time to reflect on her growth and the impact she’s had on her clients. In what she describes as the most meaningful moment from her internship, Pasley’s was reunited with the first client she ever worked with. She remembers,

“the client’s face lit up when I walked into the room. Her DSS [Department of Social Services] worker added that the client found her voice through me and rediscovered her purpose.”

After her experience working with clients one-on-one, Pasley now wants to turn her attention to the legal system, focusing on “the structural issues that affect every individual involved with the legal system.” She says a change is overdue and is passionate about addressing unseen issues.

We can’t wait to see how Logan Pasley continues to change lives at Youth Connect and beyond!

Are you interested in completing your own internship as a psychology student? Visit the department’s internship page or contact Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand at findely@roanoke.edu.

Get Connected!

William & Mary Masters Program Diversity Open House

Are you a current student interested in graduate school?


The College of William and Mary will be holding a Diversity Open House for their Masters Program in Psychology over Zoom. The Masters Program in Psychology is a 2-year research-focused program designed to help prepare students for admission to Ph.D programs. All Roanoke psychology students are encouraged to attend to learn more about the program.

The Open House which will be held on October 25th at 6:00pm EST. Click here to RSVP!

Get Connected!

Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: @rcpsychology #PsychRC

Internship Highlight: Avery Jackson

The Roanoke College psychology department is always proud to recognize the work of our fantastic students. Today we are highlighting Avery Jackson who completed an internship this summer at Children and Family Associates in Roanoke, VA.

Avery is a senior from Yarmouth, Maine who is double majoring in Communications and Psychology. She shares that she was motivated to pursue this internship because “I knew I wanted to have a hand on experience with a counselor.”

While interning at Children and Family Associates, Avery was able to observe counseling sessions and discuss her questions and comments with the counselor afterwards. She shares what a typical day in her internship looked like: ” an average day would involve me going in at noon to debrief with my supervisor on the previous day. I would then sit in on the sessions each hour unless the client requested for me to not be present.”

This direct experience paid off since Avery says, “I wasn’t sure if I wanted to work with children, but after this experience I know that I want to pursue this career.”

I asked Avery to reflect on a meaningful moment from her experience. She shares that the most impactful memory occurred as she was wrapping up her internship:

“My supervisor pushed me to fill out the report for a new client. After meeting with this new client, my supervisor asked me what I would diagnose this patient with. I replied with what I thought the diagnoses would be and I remember a huge smile coming across her face. She told me she was so impressed and proud of me. She pushed and encouraged me the whole summer and made me realize that this is what I want to do, and I can do it.

Avery Jackson ’23

Avery’s work is an exciting example of the benefits of completing internships as a psychology student. We can’t wait to see what Avery does in the future and how her internship experience guides her career!

Psychology students who are interested in completing an internship can contact the department’s Internship Coordinator, Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand (findley@roanoke.edu) for more information.

Get Connected!

PLACE Senior Series Fall 2022

Calling all Seniors!

PLACE (Center for Purpose, Life, and Career Exploration) is hosting a Senior Series on Wednesday evenings to prepare Roanoke students for the job search and life as a recent college graduate.

Senior Series events are taking place on Wednesday evenings from 7:00-8:00pm. The sessions cover a variety of topics relating to professional development. Psychology students who are planning to entering the job market immediately after graduation will especially benefit from these events!

There are three topics remaining in the series:

  • Professional Interview Preparation
    • Oct. 5th (Pickle Meeting Room – Colket Center)
  • Professional Development: Dress and Act for the Professional Goals you Seek
    • Oct. 12th (Pickle Meeting Room – Colket Center)
  • Professional Transition: Using your Skills and Career Readiness
    • Oct. 26th (Fintel Library – Classroom 1)

Students can register to attend each event on Handshake or email Amy Foster (foster@roanoke.edu) for more information.

Get Connected!

 

Welcome Dr. Kennedy-Metz!

Dr. Kennedy-Metz

The psychology department is excited to welcome a new faculty member this year!

Dr. Lauren Kennedy-Metz graduated from Roanoke College with a B.S. in Psychology, a Creative Writing minor, and a Neuroscience concentration. She then went down the road to Blacksburg where she completed a PhD in Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health with a concentration in Neuroscience at Virginia Tech.

This year Dr. Kennedy-Metz has returned to her alma mater where she is currently teaching Introduction to Psychology and Cognitive Psychology, as well as serving as the faculty advisor for Psi Chi and RCPA.

When asked what brought her back to Roanoke, Dr. Kennedy-Metz shared that the Roanoke College Psychology Department was her “ideal scenario” for a work environment. She says the department is “where I learned the most about myself, my interests, my strengths as a student and as a human.” She adds that “it’s where I was afforded the opportunities to thrive through the encouragement of lifelong faculty members.” In addition, this native New-Englander shared that “the Roanoke area has always felt like home.”

Dr. Kennedy-Metz brings a unique research background to the department. She summarizes her work as follows:

“My research interests include characterizing psychophysiological indicators of acute stress and developing biofeedback-based approaches to stress management interventions.  Most importantly, I’m interested in taking a tailored approach to both of these things within specific high-stress populations both on campus and beyond (e.g., students, student-athletes, police officers, healthcare workers, kitchen staff, etc.).”

Dr. Kennedy-Metz says she became interested in this topic because the experience of stress is very relatable, but people are often left in the dark about how to respond to it appropriately. However, properly responding to stress is a critical topic, especially for the populations mentioned above.

Speaking to current psychology students, Dr. Kennedy-Metz encourages you to “get involved in things that interest them early on.” She recommends exploring research, clubs, club sports, internships, study abroad and anything else that catches your eye. When trying new things, Dr. Kennedy-Metz says, “worst case you learn that it isn’t for you, and you move on!” She closes with this sage advice. “If you push yourself outside of your comfort zone and end up finding a niche you love, you might look back one day and wonder how different things may have been if you hadn’t taken that first step.”

Be sure to say hi to Dr. Kennedy-Metz when you see her around on the 5th floor of Life Science.

Welcome back to Roanoke, Dr. Kennedy-Metz!

Get Connected!

Black Student Alliance Presents Faculty/Staff vs. Students Basketball Tournament

Tonight – Friday, September 23, at 7:00p, the Black Student Alliance is hosting a Faculty/Staff vs Students Basketball game in Bast Gym. Dr. Nichols, chair of the Psychology Department, will be playing (loosely defined). It would be great to see support from the Psychology department for all participants!

Black Student Alliance presents Faculty/Staff vs Students Basketball Tournament
7:00 p.m.
Bast Center, Gym

Let’s boost our school spirit and morale as faculty and staff take on students in a basketball tournament!

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Out of the Darkness Walk Oct. 1st

Mark your calendars!

This year’s Salem-Roanoke Out of the Darkness Walk for suicide prevention is taking place on Saturday October 1st. The annual event is hosted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to raise awareness and support for suicide prevention.

RCPA and Psi Chi are joining the Roanoke community by walking as a team. The event begins at 10am at the Cregger Center right here on campus. All psychology students and faculty are encouraged to sign up to walk with the team or donate to AFSP at the link below:

https://supporting.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donordrive.team&teamID=305370

We hope to see you there.

Get Connected!

Princeton Review: Roanoke is a Great School for Psychology Majors

Psychology students presenting poster

Once again, the Princeton Review has rated Roanoke College as one of its Great Schools for Psychology Majors (and some other great things too.) The full story can be found here:

https://www.roanoke.edu/about/news/princeton_review_best_388_colleges

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Professor on the news!

Photo of Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand
Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand

Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand was featured on a recent story on WDBJ about classroom disruptions as students return to schools:

https://www.wdbj7.com/2022/08/09/schools-are-seeing-an-increase-classroom-disruptions-students-return-full-in-person-learning/

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Pie-a-Prof is back!

Pie-A-Professor is back! Roanoke College Psychology student organizations are proud to present PIE-A-PROF 2022.

On Monday, April 25th, stop by the front patio of Colket to take part in this annual fundraiser. As usual, the proceeds from this event will go to the Bradley Free Clinic Behavioral Health Services.

You can use this link or scan the QR code pictured above to purchase a pie for only $3.00!

This event will be from 4:00PM to 5:00PM. We hope to see you stop by!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Phi Beta Kappa News

Congratulations to all Roanoke College students who have been elected into Phi Beta Kappa during their undergrad years. PBK recognized and celebrates excellence in the liberal arts and sciences and championed freedom of thought. As America’s most prestigious academic honor society, PBK is uniquely equipped to advocate for the value and benefits of liberal arts and sciences education.

This semester, Roanoke College held its election for new junior and senior members, and the Psychology Department is happy to report that the following Psych majors were elected:

Alice Chandler 
Maya Lamprinakos
Carey Linkous
Angela Ross
Anne Schoelkopf

We are so proud of the students above and of the additional Psychology majors that have been elected in prior semesters. You are all doing a great job at representing your college and our department. Thank you!

Congratulation PNG Transparent Images | PNG All
https://www.pngall.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Congratulation-Download-PNG.png

We look forward to celebrating with you at the formal initiation ceremony, which will take place at 2:30pm in Antrim Chapel on Friday, May 6th, 2022. If you are a student recently elected into PBK, please check your email for a link to RSVP for the initiation ceremony.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Reid Conference at UVA

The annual L. Starling Reid Psychology Research Conference at the University of Virginia highlights empirical research conducted by undergraduate scholars.  Registration is free!

Presentation formats are research talks (15 minutes) or posters. The 16th Annual Reid Conference (Virtual Format) is scheduled for:

Friday, April 15th (this Friday!)

8:30 am – 4:45 PM

You can register here. Or by copying and pasting this link: https://psychology.as.virginia.edu/reid-conference

All conference guests and presenters are required to register prior to the conference.  After you register you will receive a zoom meeting link just for you. If someone you know also needs a link, please ask them to register to obtain a link (rather than sharing your link). This enables UVA to communicate with everyone who attends.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Summer Job & Internship Opportunity

Florida International University’s Summer Treatment Program: Summer positions are available for Counselors, Research Assistants, Teachers, and Classroom Aides.

From William Pelham, director of the center: 

Students who have participated in the program have uniformly viewed the experience as an extremely demanding one, but one that makes a great contribution to their professional development. The experience and recommendations gained in our program have helped many of our undergraduates continue in graduate careers in the helping professions. The experience is also quite useful for undergraduate students interested in clinical research in child psychopathology, pharmacology, and psychotherapy.

Position descriptions, application forms, and instructions are available at https://ccf.fiu.edu/summer-programs/index.html.


REMINDER that summer opportunities like this one can also count for internship credit!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Congratulations Ben!

Ben Campbell, class of 2022, completed a project titled Effects of Elicited Jealousy on Threatened Masculinity and Relational Aggression in Emerging Adult Men. This project was supervised by Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand and Ben received a grant for his research from Psi Chi!

Below is the abstract so you can learn more about the study and all of the great work Ben did!

“This paper is a two-study investigation of the effects of jealousy on threatened masculinity and relational aggression use in emerging adult men (Study 1, age 18-25, N = 151;Study 2, N = 163). The project aimed to expand on previous literature of precarious manhood theory (Vandello et al., 2008) and jealousy (DeSteno et al., 2006), but examining relational aggression instead of overt forms. The goal of Study 1 was to see if friendship jealousy with a friendship dyad affected felt masculinity and relational aggression use. Study 2 aimed to expand on findings from Study 1, and investigate if there were also differences based on friend group size (i.e., friendship dyad vs friend group). A jealousy manipulation was created to elicit feelings of friendship jealousy on feelings of threatened masculinity and relational aggression. Results from Study 1 found that participants in the jealousy condition reported feeling less masculine, used more relational aggression towards their peer, and also felt several negative emotions(anger, distress, discomfort, threatened). Study 2 findings replicated those of Study 1, but also found that relational aggression was particularly high for those who felt jealousy within the context of a friendship group, rather than friendship dyad, and threatened masculinity mediated the effect of jealousy on relational aggression use. This project provides evidence that men feeling jealousy towards a friend, or group of friends, may result in an increased threat to their masculinity, and cause them to be more relationally aggressive towards their friend(s).”

I asked Ben about his experience doing this project and he said,
“This experience has been amazing. I worked on this project for over a year, so being able to present the final product felt incredible. I’m so happy to have had such a supportive group of faculty and friends to show interest in and listen to the findings and importance of my study!”

Ben, your future is bright and we cannot wait to see what is in store for you!

Job/Internship Fair

Are you currently searching, or are interested in learning more about a job or internship?

If so, then make sure to come out to the Job and Internship fair, hosted by the PLACE. This event will occur tomorrow, Tuesday, March 1st, from 4:30pm – 6:30pm in the Wortmann Ballroom.  

All students are encouraged to attend.  Professional dress is NOT required as we realize that some students may be coming from class, lab or practice. There will be over 30 prospective employers and internship supervisors on campus and ready to answer questions.  Some businesses will have internships open each semester, so even students not looking for an immediate placement can still come and explore. 

If you have questions, or would like more details, please feel free to visit the PLACE’s website: https://www.roanoke.edu/place

Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Alumna taylor kracht gets published!

Congratulations to Taylor Kracht. Her honors in the major project was recently published in the Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research. The article, titled “Media Consumption: Association With Implicit Theories of Romantic Relationships”, examines the influence of romantic reality media on a specific set of romantic beliefs (i.e., individuals’ implicit theories of relationships) using an experimental procedure.

Taylor completed this project under the mentorship of Dr. Darcey N. Powell and graduated from Roanoke in 2018. After graduation, she went on to earn her masters degree in Couples, Marriage, and Family Counseling from William and Mary. Taylor has worked on other research projects while she was in Dr. Powell’s research lab and has been published as a co-author before, but this is her only first author publication.


“Getting this project published means a lot to me. I worked really hard my senior year creating the idea, developing the experiment, and then bringing it to fruition. Then the process of getting it published was extensive, and at many times, seemed defeating. Pushing through all the hardships of the process and getting it officially published is an accomplishment I will always treasure. I have a greater appreciation for all publications and the hard work it takes to succeed with it.” -Taylor Kracht


After graduating with her masters degree, Taylor moved to Charlotte NC and started working at a private practice, L&B Counseling, as a Mental Health Counselor. She works with a range of clients from 13 years old to 68 years old. She generally work with those who have symptoms of anxiety, depression, grief, and relationship issues.


“I am very happy in my position, I get to work with both individuals and couples (my passion), and we have the best workplace team environment. In my personal life, I live with my boyfriend (Jack Doriss, who also went to Roanoke), and our two dogs Murphy (chocolate lab) and Arlo (golden retriever).”


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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

psychology Poster session fall 2021

The Roanoke College Psychology Department hosted our biannual poster session in Fintel Library in December of 2021. This event occurs at the end of every semester to allow students within the psychology department to present on their class projects, independent studies, and completed internship experiences.

Thank you to everyone who attended, and to those who presented. The department is proud of your hard work and grateful to have dedicated students representing Roanoke College Psychology!


Faculty and students got the opportunity to learn about the semester-long research conducted by psychology students.


Congratulations to the presenters on their hard work and success!


Researchers discussed future directions and presentations for their work.



Thank you to everyone who attended, and to those who presented! Congratulations on another successful semester!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Roanoke College Legacy

Recent Graduate Samuel Paitsel has carried on a long-lasting family legacy at Roanoke College. Graduating in December 2020, Samuel followed in his family’s footsteps and became the sixth generation in his family to graduate from the school. Samuel studied psychology over his four years at Roanoke College, and is currently working as a registered behavior technician (RBT) at Therapeutic Alliance in Roanoke, Virginia. Reflecting on his time at Roanoke College, Samuel commented,

“The professors made me feel at home, and I always felt cared about,” Paitsel says. “When I was doing rough, I knew I had a great support system to rally behind me. I also enjoyed how tight- knit the community was; you couldn’t go a day without seeing a friendly face.”

Along with work, Samuel is training as a qualified mental health professional, focusing on children under 18 years old.

Samuel was recently highlighted in the Roanoke College news letter.

https://www.roanoke.edu/about/news/samuel_paitsel_family_legacy?fbclid=IwAR1hijGodj7y9dUUCHzQPct7MgRp5nFLhgloefsySPz7ql_onOGcD8i5oqo

We wish Samuel a successful future in his career path!

congratulations TO Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand

Psychology faculty member Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand has recently had TWO publications. Her recent work is now published in the The Journal of Genetic Psychology and Emerging Adulthood. The psychology department extends our congratulations as we celebrate Dr. FVN’s recent accomplishments. Read about her publications below.

Image Not Avaliable

Interpersonal Rejection and Social Motivation in Adolescence: Moderation by Narcissism and Gender

Abstract: “Research on interpersonal rejection is voluminous, but less is known about perceived rejection in relation to social goals among peers during adolescence, especially while also considering factors that may moderate these associations. In a correlational design, we surveyed a diverse sample of middle school students to examine concurrent (Study 1; N = 269) and short-term longitudinal (Study 2; N = 321) links between rejection and adolescent communal (affiliation, closeness) and agentic (status, influence) goals, and narcissism and gender as moderators in the associations between rejection and social goals. Rejection was negatively related to (Study 1) and predicted decreases in (Study 2) communal goals. Narcissism was positively related to and predicted increases in agentic goals, and moderated the association between rejection and agentic goals (in both studies). One moderated effect of gender was found: perceived rejection predicted decreases in agentic goals for girls, but increases in agentic goals for boys. Our findings mostly align with existing research on interpersonal rejection in youth, and extend this literature by demonstrating that perceived rejection is meaningfully related to changes in trait-like social goals among peers, suggesting it may alter not only situation-specific cognitions, but also globalized goals, or motivations for peer interaction. The findings also call for further research on individual differences in associations between rejection and social goals, along with other outcomes.”


Popularity According to Emerging Adults: What is it, and How to Acquire it

Abstract: “Status among peers likely continues to play a role in social functioning and well-being beyond adolescence. This study examined how emerging adults in tertiary education defined popularity, and their beliefs regarding aggressive and prosocial behaviors affording status. The role of status motivation, own status, and gender in these definitions and beliefs were explored. Emerging adults primarily associated popularity with being central, liked, and respected. Gender prototypical features (attractiveness and likeability for women; power and centrality for men) were associated with high popularity. Compared to adolescence, popularity in emerging adulthood was associated more with likeability and less with attractiveness, power, fitting in, or antisocial behavior. Prosocial behavior, openness, extraversion, and dominance were identified as the most important ways to acquire popularity. The findings indicate that popularity is relevant to emerging adults and offer several directions for future research in order to benefit the social well-being of emerging adults in tertiary education.”

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

job opportunity alert

Research Coordinator Position in the JK Lifespan Development lab, Virginia Tech

Applications are invited for a full-time research coordinator (lab manager) position in the JK Lifespan Development lab of Dr. Jungmeen Kim-Spoon, in the Department of Psychology at Virginia Tech (https://support.psyc.vt.edu/labs/jklifespan). Projects in the lab combine developmental psychopathology and decision neuroscience to investigate brain function, emotion, cognition and personality processes, decision making and health behaviors. We use a variety of methods including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, behavioral tasks, interviews, and questionnaires. This is an excellent opportunity for a personable, motivated, and detail-oriented person seeking further research experience before applying to graduate school.  

Primary data collection responsibilities will include: recruiting young adults and family members; scheduling visits; obtaining behavioral assessments and fMRI scanning; and oversight of data collection. Primary data management responsibilities include: management and oversight of participant databases, entering data, ensuring data reliability and completeness, and preparing data for analysis. Additional key tasks include assisting with participant tracking and retention, preparation of IRB materials, and training graduate and undergraduate students on study procedures. Training for all aspects of the position, including MRI certification, will be provided. Flexible scheduling is required (e.g., evenings, weekends, and some holidays will be required). 

Desired qualifications include: 1) BA/BS in psychology, neuroscience, or related fields; 2) undergraduate or post-baccalaureate research experience, including participant recruitment and data collection; 3) demonstrated organizational and time management skills, leadership skills, interpersonal skills, and attention to detail. Experience in the administration of standard psychological assessments (including self-report, structured interviews, and behavioral tasks) and a basic understanding of data management or analysis with corresponding data (e.g., SPSS, Excel, etc.) will be considered a strength.

Required application materials: Cover letter including statement of interest, CV/Resume, list of two references. Two letters of recommendation will be required prior to final consideration.

Expected start date is early March 2022. Graduating seniors are eligible to apply if they can start working part-time (10-20 hours/week) during the Spring 2022 semester to be hired before transitioning to a full-time position upon graduation. Consideration of applications will begin immediately and on a rolling basis and will end when the position is filled. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Virginia Tech is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and is committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Apply at: www.jobs.vt.edu, Job # to search: [518893].

Pre-submission inquiries may be emailed to: Kathryn Tarnai, ktarnai@vt.edu (Research Coordinator for JK Lifespan Development Lab).

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

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Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Finish the Semester Strong!!!!

When you should study and helpful tips ?

  • try to study at least a week before your exam
  • it is best to study each day for a shorter amount of time than to cram the night before
  • if your professor has not posted a study guide: begin reviewing your notes and old quizzes
  • study smarter not harder.. set an alarm for how long you are going to study and do not check your phone during that time (put on airplane mode)
  • study with someone in your class
  • truly test yourself- ask yourself questions and answer them without notes in front of you
  • writing out notes seems to be more effective in remembering information than typing

Resources:

Take Care of Yourself

  • make sure to get enough sleep (ideally 8 hours)
  • eat a good meal before an exam
  • exercise can help reduce stress and is a good study break
  • keep your room and desk clean and tidy , there is the saying “Cluttered desk means cluttered mind” for a reason
  • and remember these tests do not define you!
  • Study hard and then relax on winter break 🙂

Good Luck !

New Majors Orientation

When? Thursday, November 18th from 4:30pm-5:30pm

Where? Life Science Room 502

This event is for anyone who is planning to major in Psychology, recently declared their major in the Psych Department, or is a psychology major and has not been able to attend this event previously.

This meeting will be very informative because we will be discussing topics such as requirements for a degree in Psychology, internship opportunities, concentrations within the major, research, and studying abroad.

If you are not sure what direction you want to go with your degree, that is okay! We are going to be talking about the many different options there are.

P.S. When you attend this event you get to sign the major’s board!

UNC Clinical Rehabilitation & Mental Health Counseling Program

The Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health (CRMH) Counseling department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has extended an invitation to students who may be interested in pursuing a degree in counseling to come to one of their upcoming Information Sessions on the following dates:

Wednesday 11/17 12:00 pm-1:00 pm ET
Monday 12/16 11:30am-12:30pm ET
Tuesday 01/11 12:00 pm-1:00pm ET
Friday 02/11 4:00pm-5:00pm ET

In addition to their website, which can be found here, the Information Sessions are a good way to find out more about the CRMH program from a faculty member, ask questions about the program and application process, and meet with current students to hear about the program from their perspective. Interested students may RSVP to any of the above dates at CRMHinfo@med.unc.edu to receive the Zoom link for the Information Session.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Local Organization Highlight

Go Check out the Family and Wellness Initiative! This is a local, non-profit organization in the Roanoke area. They focus on establishing healthy, strong, and supportive family environments within the Roanoke community. They offer parenting workshops for ages 0-5 and 5-12, free community events, health advice for children (e.g., nutrition, active lifestyles, and mind and body wellness), school connections, parenting tips, and how parents can healthily learn and get involved in youth culture with their children. They are supported by Blue Ridge Behavioral Health, Prevention, and Wellness Services, and funded by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services. 

If you are interested in learning more about the Family and Wellness Initiative, you can find them at https://www.familywellnessinitiative.com/. Also make sure to follow their blog at https://www.familywellnessinitiative.com/blog!

making the most of Your time as a psychology student

  • Research

If research in the field interests you, there are many ways to get involved here at Roanoke!

Also check out the Psychology Blog: http://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

Areas of Psychology

Roanoke College offers so many amazing psychology courses for their students. Anyone can find a topic that peaks their interest; from Intro to Psychology to Principles of Neuroscience we have it all!

Seven major perspectives of modern psychology
https://www.verywellmind.com/perspectives-in-modern-psychology-2795595

Want to learn all about memory, attention, language, and how we solve problems? If so, you should consider taking Cognitive Psychology. If you want to go further with these topics consider enrolling in Human Memory, 342 Learning, Creative Thinking and Problem- Solving, or Topics in Cognitive Psychology.

Developmental Psychology goes in depth about each life period- discussing cognitive abilities, social setting, work/school situations, health, common obstacles faced, etc . If one specific age range of this class interests you, you can dive deeper by enrolling in Child Development, Adolescent development, or Adult Development and Aging.

Social psychology focuses on relationships and interactions between people. Biological Psychology teaches us that the brain has an impact on our behavior, decision making, etc. This class discusses the research that has explained how different parts of the brain are responsible for different tasks.

Research Methods in Psychology gives students an understanding of how research is conducted, different types of studies, safety of participants, and examining the reliability and validity of a study.

Similar to a statistics class, Quantitative Methods in Psychology interprets data that measures behavior and uses computer programs to discover trends, standard error, median, mean, etc.

Clinical Psychology discusses the history of clinical psychology and the diagnosis of psychological disorders and how to treat them.

These are just some of the courses offered in our Psychology department for a full list and more details you can visit https://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology/course_information/psychology_course_descriptions

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

New Publication Alert: Dr. Powell & Stephanie Gaines

gold dragon statue during daytime

Congratulations to Dr. Darcey Powell and alumni Stephanie Gaines (class of 2017) on their recent publication by Psi Chi. The publication is based on one of Gaines’s projects that took place in Dr. Powell’s lab during her time at Roanoke College. More information about the information can be found here, but you can read the abstract below:

Emerging adulthood is a time of great transition, including but not limited to the commencement of “adult roles” and responsibilities. The present study examined emerging adults’ (EAs’) perceptions of transitional (i.e., cohabitating, marriage, parenting) and gradual (i.e., religious beliefs, political beliefs, managing own health) roles. Participants were recruited from a small liberal arts college (N = 88) and from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform (N = 181). They were surveyed on the age at which they anticipated or reported achieving the examined roles and their current self-efficacy for the roles. Female EAs reported intending to or achieving the transitional roles at a significantly later age than female EAs of the late 20th century (ps ≤ .001, ds 0.77–0.95). Additionally, female EAs anticipated role achievement for cohabitating, marriage, parenting, and religious beliefs at later ages than male EAs (ps < .05, gs 0.33–1.33). Moreover, male and female EAs differed in a few role-specific self-efficacies if they had not yet achieved the desired adult role (e.g., marriage, parenting; ps < .05, gs 0.62–0.98), but did not differ if they had already achieved the role. Lastly, the difference between EAs’ age and their role achievement largely did not predict their role-specific self-efficacies. The results provide additional insight into EAs’ expectations and current perceptions of themselves and may be useful to individuals who work regularly with EAs who are apprehensive about the extent to which they are “on time” and “ready” to engage in the examined transitional and gradual roles.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Midterms approaching… are you prepared?

Frustrated Over It GIF by The Dude Perfect Show

The only thing scarier than Halloween this month is mid-terms. Have you started (even thinking) about studying yet? Whether you have a color-coded plan or this is the first time you’re realizing mid-terms are a thing, here are some tips and tricks to stay calm, stay smart, and ultimately ace your quickly approaching mid-terms week. Remember, you’ve got this!

Study Smarter

Have you ever really used the school’s academic resources? Please do! In addition to going to your professors’ office hours, students should check out the Goode-Pasfield Center for Learning and Teaching, which is located in the Fintel Library and is the focal point for academic counseling and academic support on campus. The staff will assist you in identifying your academic strengths and weaknesses, designing an individual study program, and resolving your academic concerns. The Center coordinates academic advising for undeclared students, the Writing Center, the Subject Tutoring Program, the RC Success Program, and Accessible Education Services. Dr. Sue Brown directs the Academic Services. Dr Sandee McGlaun directs the Writing Center. Check out this site for instructions on how to make your own study schedule.

Mix Up Your Methods

We all know that awful feeling of sitting in your dorm room and staring at assignments for too long. It is exhausting and drain us of the little motivation we have left at this point during the semester. Try switching up your study location (the library, an open classroom, off-campus coffee shops, etc.) to add some variety into your routine.

If the way you’re studying is the problem, try using an online learning tool or asking a friend to quiz you so you get a break from reviewing your notes. In fact, ask a couple of friends if they would like to get together and set up a study session. You can work on similar tasks or completely different ones – but having someone else there may help keep you accountable for the work you’re meant to be doing.

Stay Calm

Feelings of anxiety and stress are almost unavoidable for college students as a busy week approaches, but there are plenty of things you can do for yourself that will help you remain calm and, ultimately, perform better. The main thing is to get some sleep. You might be tempted to pull an all-nighter, but a good night’s sleep is key to your success. An extra hour of sleep will take you wayyyy farther than an extra hour of cramming for an exam. Next, remind yourself that you can do this. You were smart enough to make it this far, and you are smart enough to make it through mid-terms. Remember to use your support network: friends, family, and faculty and staff are here to help you make it through stressful times.

Im Okay Keeping Up With The Kardashians GIF by E!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

UVA’s openhouse

On December 13th at 4 pm UVA will be having a virtual open house about their applied developmental science graduate program!

To learn more about this program go to: https://education.virginia.edu/academics/educational-psychology-applied-developmental-science

This meeting is an amazing opportunity to ask questions, learn more about what a graduate program entails, and hear other people’s thoughts and perspectives!

To register go to: https://virginia.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMtf-qvqjgvHNfmUovnid98ylltkv-Jygws

We hope to see your faces on zoom!

Upcoming RC Events!

Thinking of ways to gain more knowledge on important issues and topics outside of the classroom? Say less. Roanoke College offers many amazing events each week for all students and faculty to attend!

This week, Oct 4-9, Roanoke is holding several Zoom, and in-person events and talks. On Tuesday, Oct 5, there will be an Elderscholar Program, “What’s in a statue? Notes on the Roanoke Country confederate memorial” led by Dr. Robert Willingham from 12 PM – 1:15 PM. On Wednesday from 12 PM – 1:15 PM, the Eldershcolar Program will be hosting another talk, “Writing Your Story” by Ms. Mary Crockett Hill. Also on Wednesday from 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM, there will be an informative talk on Covid-19 titled “Ask the Epidemiologist.” Alumni Ashley Briggs ‘13 and her colleagues will host a Zoom discussion on the impact and experiences throughout the pandemic. 

These are just a few examples of upcoming events. For more information, visit https://www.roanoke.edu/events.

Get out and learn!

Looking for Spring Classes?

APA recently uploaded an article about “The superpowers of the psychology major” (read more at:https://www.apa.org/ed/precollege/psychology-teacher-network/introductory-psychology/superpowers-psychology-major ). Author, Dr. Stephen Chew, writes that there are 6 “superpowers” that are learned in a psychology degree. Psychology students are taught: how to learn effectively, manage stress and anxiety, become efficient with completing complex tasks, understand personality traits and differences in people, scientific literacy, and knowledge on biases and prejudices. All of these skills can be effectively applied to almost every aspect of life. Whether that be one’s professional life, family life, home life, social life, etc.

Now it’s time to focus on how YOU can get involved in psychology and achieve these superpowers. This upcoming Spring semester (2022), there will be a total of 11 psychology courses being offered! If you are new to the discipline and need an INQ260, consider taking INQ 260PY – Psyc of Agression. Or enroll in Psyc 101-Intro Psych, which will have multiple time slots. Intro Psyc will teach you the basics of psychology, and help you explore all of the different areas of study. If you have already taken the intro course, the department offers several courses on specific areas of the discipline including: developmental psychology, social psychology, cognitive psychology, adolescent psychology, research methods, quantitative methods, history of psychology, psychology and the law, and research seminars in social development and neuroscience. There are also opportunities to get involved in research with professors!

If any of these opportunities sound interesting to you, reach out to one of the Psychology Department faculty and/or add one or more of the classes to your Spring schedule. You, too, can achieve the special superpowers of a psychology student!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

out of the darkness walk

This month is Suicide Prevention month. Roanoke College has decided to organize a walk to spread awareness, show support, and hopefully raise money to help reduce suicide rates.

The walk is on campus from 10-12 and anyone is welcome to participate.

If you want more information or are able to donate please go to https://supporting.afsp.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.team&teamID=281966

I hope to see you guys there!

Dr. Eyad Naseralla

Meet Dr. Eyad Naseralla!

Dr. Naseralla is a first year professor of psychology here at Roanoke College. Dr. Naseralla completed his undergraduate degree at Texas Tech University, and his PhD at St. Louis University. His research investigates perceptions of victims, focusing on victims of sexual violence. When asked about his research, Dr. Naseralla explained, “What I like to do is find things that are common, but also overlooked. Things like reporting. Sexual assault is really underreported, so looking at that and seeing how people respond to that.”

When discussing his research further, Dr. Naseralla gave us his two key takeaways as a researcher, “The two biggest takeaways as a researcher are not to get too caught up with things, I think that sometimes it is better to keep things moving. The second biggest thing is that it’s super important to be conscientious….Being organized and managing your time well. That is really key to doing the things that you love to do.” 

Dr. Naseralla is currently teaching two Psych-101 courses, as well as Psych-319: Psychology and Law. When asked what his favorite part of teaching at Roanoke College was so far, Dr. Naseralla responded with, “The fact that the students here are extremely eager. The smaller classes make things feel more personal. It feels like there is more of a relationship there, and students are really eager to learn and participate. I really enjoy that.” 

We are very excited to have Dr. Naseralla with us at Roanoke College this year!

Graduate school panel

This is a great opportunity for all Roanoke students! At this panel you can ask any questions you have in regards to graduate school. This event takes place tomorrow (9/28) from 12-1 in life science 502! Bonus- there will be pizza for everyone! I hope to see you there!

Thinking about psychology?

…we know you are…

What you need to know about the department:
Majors, minors, and concentrations

Hey new (or not-so-new) students! Have you been debating joining the Psychology Department at Roanoke College? Or maybe just wanting to know more about our programs? You’re in the right spot! Below are the basics about the department and different programs we offer. More information can always be found online or acquired through professors and student assistant staff. Let us know your questions!

Major in Psychology

Note: The requirements listed below are for students declaring the Psychology Major anytime after 8-11-2021. To see OLD requirements for those declaring the major prior to this date, please refer to our website.

chart of units that must be completed

The psychology major is a bachelor of science and requires the completion of 12 units. These units include core (general and methods) classes, one class from each of the 4 domains of psychology, and three elective classes.

Minor in Psychology

chart of units that must be completed

Psychology intersects with many other areas of study in a variety of ways because of its focus on people. A minor in psychology can be a useful addition to any major with the selection of courses tailored to fit what is most relevant to the student. The minor in psychology requires the completion of 6 units.

Human Development Concentration

Table of courses needed for the human development concentration

The Concentration in Human Development exposes students to the broader life-span perspective and allows them to focus on the stages (e.g., childhood, adolescence, adulthood) and the topics most applicable to their personal or professional goals. The concentration requires six units and the faculty coordinator is Dr. Powell.

Neuroscience Concentration

chart of units that must be completed

A concentration in neuroscience will offer students an opportunity to learn about theory and research on the brain and nervous system from a number of perspectives. Students will come to understand how developments in biology, psychology, chemistry and related fields alter knowledge and research techniques in the other fields. The faculty coordinator is Dr. Nichols.


Ready to declare? You can do so online here… or you can find a list of our amazing faculty members on this page. Contact one of them to find out more information on whichever program you may be interested in. And make sure to check out the spreadsheets with course information – you may be surprised by how diverse and interesting the Psychology Department’s curriculum can be. We can’t wait to have you!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Dr. Andrea Burchfield

Meet Dr. Andrea Burchfield!
We are excited for her to join our psychology team this year 🙂

Dr. Burchfield gives us a little background information about herself when she writes, “I grew up in Northern Virginia before finding my home in the Roanoke Valley. I earned a BS in Psychology from Radford University in 2006, and then worked as an ABA Therapist with the Blue Ridge Autism and Achievement Center before returning to school. I earned a MA (2012) and PhD (2018) in Psychology from George Mason University, where my research focused on the effects of a mindfulness-based program for parents of children with autism.

I enjoy bringing my clinical experiences into the classroom through sharing relatable stories, exposing students to the practice of mindful meditation, and by using the science of behaviorism to teach course material effectively. My favorite thing about teaching is building relationships with students, and watching them learn and succeed. Therefore, I’m passionate about discovering ways to enhance access to connections, education, and opportunities on campus, particularly for students with disabilities.”

We are lucky to have her here at Roanoke College!

rc psychology highlight: Research

Claire McDonald and Ben Campbell, both psychology seniors at Roanoke College, were recently featured on Roanoke’s website for their research experience. You can check out the full page here.

Claire McDonald, Class of 2022

Claire wasn’t sure what degree she wanted to pursue when she first came to Roanoke College. But during the fall semester of her sophomore year, she enrolled in a developmental psychology class, taught by Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand, assistant professor of psychology. She loved the class and, consequently, found her major.

In the spring of her sophomore year, McDonald joined a lab managed by Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand, which focused on adolescent and young adult peer relationships. This sparked her interest in research within psychology. This fall, Claire plans to work as a research intern at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Salem. She hopes to apply to graduate school to pursue a doctorate in clinical psychology with a specific interest in research related to dementia and cognitive impairment in older adults — experience Claire said she hopes to gain at the VA Medical Center. But she’s not the only psychology student that has recently made big steps in their research experience…

“Research has played a huge role in my college career and in my development as a student. It has been the most crucial and beneficial part of my college experience.”

Ben Campbell, Class of 2022

Ben Campbell has used his interest in relational aggression, peer social dynamics and gender to formulate a study. He used the study to apply for the College’s Summer Scholars Program and received the prestigious award, enabling him to carry a project titled “Effects of elicited jealousy on masculinity and relational aggression in men.” You can check out more info on his research journey in our previous blog post, found here.


In recent years, approximately 30 students each semester have been involved in research. The experiences are important not just for information discovery, but also for deepened learning, enhanced training on specific topics or methods, and the development of skills that graduate training programs and employers in careers utilizing psychology look for and highly value. As a research assistant, students also develop professional and mentoring relationships with their faculty mentor, and refine critical thinking and statistical reasoning skills.

“The experience to contribute to a discipline in a larger way is a special opportunity,” Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand said. “Apart from the professional skills developed, the research experiences students at Roanoke are involved in also contribute to the sense of community we have in the department.”

Research is the bedrock of the student experience in Roanoke College’s psychology department, which brought the College its seventh consecutive “Great Schools for Psychology Majors” recognition in The Princeton Review’s annual “Best Colleges” guidebook, released on Aug. 31.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Congratulations to Ben Campbell!

Ben was just granted funding from Psi Chi, the International Honors Society in Psychology, for his research!

Benjamin Campbell ‘22 was recently a part of our Summer Scholars program here at Roanoke, during which he conducted a study that was built from previous work he completed in the Social Development Lab. Ben’s project is titled “Effects of Peer-Elicited Jealousy on Relational Aggression in Men: The Roles of Contingent and Threatened Masculinity”.  He worked very hard on this project, supervised by Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand. Leading up to the summer, they applied for and were successfully granted $1,118 to fund this and subsequent studies including Ben’s Honors in the Major Project. 

Project Abstract:

I asked Ben to give a summary of his research and he wrote,

“So, this summer I conducted a research project as a Summer Scholar at Roanoke. The study looked at how jealousy affects threatened masculinity and relational aggression use in men. In other words, does feeling jealous in a friendship context with other men also produce feeling less masculine, and thus result in using relational aggression? My results found that following jealousy provoked by male peers, men felt less masculine and used more relational aggression relative to men who were not in the jealousy condition. But, some effects did not emerge as expected. I applied for funding from the “Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant” and was awarded it. So, I got funding to continue my project. In my honors in the major, I plan on expanding on the summer project and potentially investigating other variables that may play into the effects I found this summer. Overall, I thought the summer scholars experience was great, and the funding from Psi Chi is amazing.”

Congratulations again to Benjamin Campbell, keep up the great work and we are excited for what your future has in store.

Welcome Back Social!

When? This Friday ! (September 3rd from 11:45-1:15)

Where? Courtyard between Life Science and Trexler!

Please join your fellow Psychology students and faculty at a Welcome Back social on Friday, 9/3! We will meet in the courtyard area between Life Science and Trexler between 11:45a and 1:15p. Snacks and drinks will be provided, plus you can purchase an RC Psychology shirt! All students are welcome – majors, minors, concentrators, students currently in psychology classes, and students who may potentially take psychology classes in the future! Hope to see you there!

Get connected:

Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

CONGRATULATIONS VANESSA PEARSON: HONORS DEFENSE

Vanessa presenting during her defense on May 17, 2021

Congratulations to Vanessa Pearson ’21 for the successful defense of her Honors in the Major Project titled, “Influences on Paternity Leave” on May 17th. Her research mentor, Dr. Darcey N. Powell, was joined by committee members, Dr. Danielle Findley Van-Nostrand and Dr. David Nichols to oversee her defense. Her project abstract is pasted below.

Vanessa with her Honors in Psyc t-shirt!


Project Abstract:
The overall purpose of this study was to understand the factors that are involved when a father is deciding whether or not to take paternity leave with the birth/adoption of a child. The research was centered around two groups of participants. Study 1 sampled fathers with a child under the age of five. Study 2 sampled prospective fathers – men who are not yet fathers but may be at some point in the future. Participants completed an online survey that asked about their demographics, desired days off, and willingness to take certain types of leave. Most of the hypotheses were not significant or unable to be tested due to sample limitations. For example, several social-demographic factors were not associated with the number of days or types of leave one would take. Even though the findings were not significant, this could mean that the proportion of men who are taking or plan to take paternity leave are increasing and the factors that are holding them back are decreasing. Additionally, while fathers were more likely to know about FMLA than prospective fathers, a majority in both samples believed the US did not have an acceptable leave policy.

Congratulations again to Vanessa Pearson ’21 on a successful defense! We look forward to seeing all you accomplish in the future!

SENIOR HIGHLIGHT: Maggie lewis, Lauren Powell, Destinee Sinclair, mason wheeler, and Allison tice!

Over the next few days, we will be highlighting the Psychology Department graduating seniors! This post will highlight 5 seniors: Maggie Lewis, Lauren Powell, Destinee Sinclair, Mason Wheeler, and Allison Tice.

Maggie Lewis

Maggie will be working full time as a Recovery Advocate at an inpatient psychiatric facility in my home state. 

Maggies favorite memory was completing mock clinical assessments in Dr. Hilton’s Clinical Psych course. 

Lauren Powell

After graduation, Lauren is continuing her education at the University of Lynchburg where she will obtain her M.Ed. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling! 

Laurens states: “My favorite memory of the psychology department is doing research with Dr. Buchholz over the course of four years as a part of the research fellows program!”

Destinee Sinclair

Destinee will be attending East Carolina University pursuing a Master’s degree in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 

Mason Wheeler

Mason plans to pursue her PhD at Virginia Tech’s Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, studying Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health.

Allison Tice

Allison will be attending Virginia Tech (Roanoke Higher-Ed Center) to receive her Masters of Arts in Counselor Education. She plans to then potentially pursue a PhD and hopefully open her own counseling practice. 

When asked about her favorite memory she stated “I love pie-a-prof! Always such a fun event!”

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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SENIOR HIGHLIGHT: Carolynn Bructo, Katherine Caldwell, Alyssa Mattson, grace page, and Vanessa Pearson!

Over the next few days, we will be highlighting the Psychology Department graduating seniors! This post will highlight 5 seniors: Carolynn Bructo, Katherine Caldwell, Alyssa Mattson, Grace Page, and Vanessa Pearson.

Carolynn Bructo

Carolynn plans to go back home to Columbus, Ohio, where she will take a gap year and then apply to Ohio State’s School Psychology program.

Katherine Caldwell

Katherine plans on working until going to graduate school to get her masters. She plans to become a marriage and family counselor in the future.

Alyssa Mattson

Alyssa will be taking an IL course as she resumes her LSAT studies and completes her research practicum. She plans to apply to law schools and resume her job search following her move to Washington, D.C.

Grace Page

Grace will be a part of Liberty University’s Marriage and Family Counseling Master’s program while also working full-time for a local non-profit organization.

Vanessa Pearson

After graduation, Vanessa will be teaching elementary school in Franklin County and will soon start a graduate school program on school counseling. 

Vanessa states: “My favorite psychology related memory is from Dr. FVN’s introduction to psychology class. During the lesson on conformity. We started the class standing up in order to see if anyone would come in late and see if they would sit down or stand up just because everyone else was. It was a fun activity to begin the lesson.”

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Congratulations Curt Kingery: Honors defense!

Kingery ’21 with his family while rocking his H.I.P (honors in psychology) shirt!

Congratulations to Curt Kingery ’21 for the successful defense of his Honors in the Major Project entitled “Tradeoffs In Designing Ideal Leaders: Does Political Ideology Predict Preferences for Dominant and Prestigious Leaders?” His supervisor, Dr. Lindsey Osterman was joined by committee members, Dr. Danielle Findley Van-Nostrand and Dr. Stacy Wetmore to oversee his defense.

Kingery ’21 and his committee members on his Zoom defense

Project Abstract:

Politicians rise to positions of significant influence through different displays of leadership behavior. Two distinct patterns for climbing social hierarchies, and obtaining leadership roles, have emerged from recent research: dominance-oriented and prestige-oriented strategies. These represent profoundly different navigation tactics that accomplish a singular goal, which is to ascend status hierarchies. Which strategy most effectively gains status depends heavily on contextual factors (such as environmental instability and perceptions of intergroup conflict) and the characteristics and needs of followers. Political candidates’ abilities to display cues consistent with one of these orientations, in the appropriate contexts, will impact perceptions of them by potential supporters who are critical to their political success. Evolutionary and social psychological research suggest followership evolved as a strategy to overcome multifarious cooperation and coordination problems from social group-living. Hence, left-leaning or right-leaning political followers’ preconceptions about the world may predispose them to defer status to qualitatively different leaders. In Study 1, we investigated whether or not political orientation reliably predicted a preference for traits associated with dominance or prestige-oriented leader. Participants designed ideal leaders, purchasing various characteristics with 3 different budgets. The different budgets unveiled trade-offs made under constraints. In Study 2, we replicated findings from the first study, and extended the understanding of circumstantial triggers for different leader orientations by assessing the role of—self-perceived—socioeconomic (in)security and pathogenic vulnerability on revealed preferences for an ideal leader.

Congratulations again to Curt Kingery ’21 on a successful defense and we look forward to seeing all you accomplish in the future!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology