Category Archives: Classes

Welcome Dr. Dane Hilton!

The Psychology Department would like to welcome Dr. Dane Hilton as our newest tenure-track professor starting this upcoming fall semester. Dr. Hilton obtained his Masters in Clinical Health Psychology from Appalachian State University and his PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Alabama.

At Roanoke, Dr. Hilton will be teaching courses such as Abnormal, Personality, and Clinical Psychology. His research interests focus specifically on social encoding, executive functioning, and mindfulness. Dr. Hilton has conducted research on social skills in youth and emerging adults, especially those with ADHD, and on psycho-social interventions for those with executive functioning deficits.

Dr. Hilton is currently looking for student research assistants to start next semester. If you’re interested, follow this link to learn more.

Welcome again to Dr. Hilton! We are excited for him to be joining the department!

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Alumni Career Fair!

Are you looking for internships? Job opportunities? Then consider attending to Alumni Career Fair! The event will be held on Thursday, April 12th, from 5-7 pm on the main level of Colket.

Why should you attend? According to Director McLawhorn of Career Services, alumni from around 30 companies/organizations/career fields of various industries and geographic locations will be there to share about their career fields, as well as provide information about internships and/or job opportunities that may be available at their respective places of employment.

Some company recruiters will be there as well.

Things you should know before you go: 

  • Neat, but casual clothing is fine.
  • It’s highly suggested that students bring resumes, but they are not required. (Students can contact Career Services for assistance with resumes prior to April 12.)
  • There will be door prizes.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Psychology Summer Courses 2018

Do you want to get ahead, catch up, or just want to take an interesting course over the summer?

Then consider signing up for psychology summer courses!

Three 300-level courses will be offered, including History of Psychology, which is a requirement for psychology majors, Abnormal Psychology, IO Psychology, and Drugs & Behavior. In addition to the 300-level courses, the psychology department will also be offering a 260 INQ course taught by Dr. Whitson that will also count towards a major in psychology.

If interested, please talk to your advisor(s) and sign-up through Webadvisor while spots remain!

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Student Publication & Updates

Last semester, students from Dr. Nichols lab published a paper titled “Exploration of Methodological and Participant-Related Influences on the Number of Artifacts in ERP Data.”

Under the direction of Dr. Nichols, Ms. Stephanie M. Shields and Ms. Caitlin E. Morse conducted a study in order to see how the number of trials needed to collect enough data for Event-related Potential (ERP) could be minimized through the reduction of artifacts.

Typically, this type of research requires a number of trials in order to collect enough data. Oftentimes, several of these trials have to be discarded as a result of artifacts, or errors.

Shields, Morse, and Nichols focused specifically on the connections between “the number of trials that have to be eliminated due to artifacts and a set of methodological variables, physical considerations, and individual differences.”

To read more about what they found as a result of their research, follow this link to the original article.

Related: Ms. Shields was awarded a Fulbright grant to return to Germany to study bat vocalizations and vocal learning in Munich, Germany from September 2017-July 2018. Prior to this, she spent a summer in Hamburg, Germany through the German Academic Exchange Service Research Internship in Science and Engineering. While there, she completed a research project with Ph.D. student Signe Luisa Schneider on electroencephalography (EEG), learning, and memory. (To find out more about this latter project, follow this link.) Shields also completed over three years of research in the psychology department and had other articles published as well. She graduated with a major in psychology, a concentration in neuroscience, and a minor in German. She plans on earning a Ph.D. in Neuroscience.

Related: Ms. Morse currently works as a Licensed Nursing Assistant at Portsmouth Regional Hospital in New Hampshire. Graduating from Roanoke College with a degree in Kinesiology and Exercise Science in 2017, she followed this by attending the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences where she completed a Bachelor of Science degree in order to become a registered nurse. While at Roanoke College, she worked as a research assistant in the psychology department for around three and a half years, starting in 2013. She has also participated in two other published articles through Dr. Nichols lab, alongside Ms. Shields and other students. Her Linked In account can be found here.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

A Paid Summer Internship Opportunity at UNC, Chapel Hill

The Old Well at UNC, Chapel Hill

Interested in conducting research on increasing political tolerance?

Thanks to a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation, the lab of Dr. Kurt Gray is looking for a few motivated undergraduates for a full-time paid 8-week summer internship (June 18th to August 10th). Interns will receive hands-on experience with study development, data collection, and data presentation, in addition to receiving $2,800 each.

To apply, please submit a CV and a letter addressing the following questions: 1) What does political tolerance mean to you? 2) Why do you want to join this summer program? 3) What unique perspectives can you provide this internship program? 4) What are your long-term career goals?

Please e-mail Emily Kubin (ekubin@ad.unc.edu) with the subject title Summer Internship 2018 by February 15th, 2018.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Summer Internship Opportunity at Florida International University

Interested in working with children in Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, or Elementary age groups? Want to be a Counselor, Classroom Aide, or Researcher? Looking for a chance to earn an internship credit?

Then consider applying to the Children’s Summer Treatment Program for children with ADHD or other related impairments at the Florida International University.

The Summer Treatment Program (STP) is a comprehensive program for children with ADHD and related behavioral, emotional and learning challenges. The STP has successfully helped more than 3,000 children and families and is composed of evidence-based intensive treatments incorporated into an eight-week therapeutic summer camp setting. Group and tailored individual treatment plans are focused on improving problem-solving, academic functioning and social skills—while also incorporating recreational, age-appropriate games and group activities.

The STP has been named a  Model Program in Child and Family Mental Health by the American Psychological Association, and has been named the program of the year by CHADD, the national parent advocacy group for children with ADHD. Students who have worked with FIU and the STP have said that it is an incredibly rewarding. hands-on experience, with huge contributions to their professional development. The program is also helpful in continuing onto graduate school and careers, such as clinical psychopathology, pharmacology, and psychotherapy.

More information about the Summer Treatment Program and the Center for Children and Families can be found here. Information about applications can be found here.

Applications for all positions are competitive so students are encouraged to apply as soon as possible.

If you are considering applying to this program, please contact Dr. Camac about earning an internship credit.

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Ohio University’s Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates

If you are looking for ways of gaining clinical research experience working with youth over the summer, considering applying to the  National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates at Ohio University.

Through this 8-week program, students will gain experience by attending seminars, working with mentors on research projects, and building a set of skills and a portfolio that will stand out to graduate schools including an independent project focused on some aspect of treatment related to youth with SEB.

Accepted students will be given a stipend of $4000, along with housing, meals, conference travel, and research incentives.

Eligible students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in their undergraduate classes and must be a US Citizen or permanent resident. Applicants who have taken research methods will be more competitive, but this is not required. Finally, students from diverse or minority backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply.

All applications must be submitted by February 23, 3018 at 5 pm.

To learn more about the program and how to apply, click here or on the above image to go to the official website.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

In Summer… Here are Some Research Opportunities

In the midst of winter as the cold seeps into our homes, we often tend to think of what we will be doing in the summer…

For students interested in summer research opportunities (including paid experiences), winter is also a good time to start thinking about applying to these opportunities, as many summer research opportunities have a deadline in January or February.

One notable exception to this is Roanoke College’s Summer Scholars program which has a deadline of March 15th.

Below are some of the opportunities available to students from every major, with the link to the full list of research opportunities here.

Examples from the Social Sciences and Humanities:

  • Leadership Alliance Mellon Initiative (many humanities and social science majors)
  • Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
  • American Economics Association Summer Training Program
  • American Political Science Association
  • Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers

Examples from the Sciences:

  • Research Experience for Undergraduates (REUs) – Includes the Sciences, Public Health, Psychology, and Anthropology
  • Pathways to Science
  • Department of Homeland Security
  • Commonwealth STEM Industry Internship Program
  • Student Conservation Association
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • National Institute of Health (NIH) Summer Internship Program
  • AMGEN Scholars

Have Men Evolved to Detect and Respond to Cues of Ovulation?

In the final blog post written by students from Dr. Osterman’s PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology to be featured on the site, students discuss how males have possibly evolved to detect and respond to cues of ovulation.

The authors, including Sarah Raines, Ryan Casey, Tori Blair, and Chasity Ramsey, focus on defining ovulation from an evolutionary standpoint and then describe the subtle cues of an ovulating woman, including how she dresses.

Providing interesting information on something few of us think of, this is the last of the three blog posts to be featured. If you’re interested in learning more about this blog either click on the screenshot above or the link below that. The other two blogs can also be found on the site.

Good job to everyone who worked hard on these blog posts! They turned out well!

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Jealousy: Successful Tactic or Harmful Emotion?

The second of three articles written by students in PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology to be featured on the blog, this article was written by North Angle, Cristoni Couvrette, and Anne Mette Rasmussen and is titled “Jealousy: Successful Tactic or Harmful Emotion?”

In the post, the authors discuss why we get jealous and the differences of jealousy exhibited between male and females, all from an evolutionary standpoint.

Please click here to read the article, or click on the screenshot above.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

It’s Evo-Lit-ionary: Why Humans Like Drinking Alcohol

As part of Dr. Osterman’s PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology class, students submit a term blog instead of a tradition term paper. Focusing on a specific topic, students form groups and explain the topic from an evolutionary perspective with accompanying memes and other relevant videos in true Roanoke College Psychology Department fashion.

Over the next few weeks, there will be three blog posts featuring her students work, beginning with the current post.

This week’s topic is focused on why humans like drinking alcohol according to evolutionary psychology and was written by Luke Harbison, Maddie McCall, Nicole Moughrabi, and Adora Nguyen.

In the article, the authors address the history of alcohol usage and continue on to describe the many reasons why we consume alcohol, including attempting to explain why our taste for alcohol is so widespread.

Sound interesting? Please follow the link to learn more.

It’s Evo-Lit-ionary: Why Humans Like Drinking Alcohol


Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Dr. Powell’s May Term Trip to Thailand Part II

In Part I, we talked about the more academic side of the trip and some differences noticed between cultures. In Part II of the Thailand May Term, we will discuss the more inherently fun and less academic parts of the trip, because, even though this was a class, it was still an experience of a lifetime.

For Dr. Darcey Powell, in addition to the conversations the group had with locals, her two favorite experiences were the Muay Thai boxing class and their day as mahouts:

[…] In the Muay Thai boxing class, we learned about that style of boxing and practiced the techniques. As mahouts, we learned how to take care of elephants with respect to feeding and bathing, as well as how to ride elephants, and then put what we learned into practice with our own elephant for the day.

Dr. Darcey Powell

Students’ experiences as mahouts at the Patara Elephant Farm in Chiang Mai was definitely one of the most favorite and memorable experiences of the trip, as Peyton Holahan ’19 recounts:

We spent the entire day playing with and learning about elephants. It really does not get much better than that in my opinion. We were greeted in the morning by the director of Patara who explained their mission as an elephant sanctuary focused on educating individuals about the health and well-being of these beautiful animals. Each person got assigned an elephant (or two) to spend the day with and it was pure magic. I was one of the lucky ones to get assigned both a mom elephant and her two-year-old baby. They told us that they assigned the elephants based on our personalities but I am certainly not planning on having kids anytime soon. I learned how to groom, feed, and bathe my elephants. Bathing them was by far the most fun because this involved getting on their backs and scrubbing them with a brush in the river. This was also really refreshing because Thailand’s climate is HOT.

A group picture interrupted by cuteness at Patara Elephant Sanctuary, picture courtesy of Dr. Powell

Along with our elephants we were partnered with mahouts who are the elephants’ caretakers and trainers. Our mahouts assisted us throughout the day in helping us ride the elephants and showing us how to take care of them. Patara is such a unique elephant sanctuary in Thailand in that they do not cage the elephants but rather let them roam freely because their mission is focused on recovery, reproduction, and reintroduction of elephants into the wild. Patara is one of the most humane elephant farms in Thailand for that reason and I am so glad that Dr. Powell chose this once in lifetime opportunity for us all to experience.

Holahan ’19

Sarah Hughes agrees with Holahan, giving her own description of her experience at the elephant farm.

I had been looking forward to going to the elephant farm since I had signed up for the trip, so I was tremendously thrilled when I found out that we each would have our own elephant for the day. We had the opportunity to feed our elephant sugar cane and bananas, inspect them for good health, bathe them, and ride them for their daily walk. I quickly learned that elephants like to eat a lot and eat quickly. This was because every time I would feed my elephant she would get mad at me and start to yell because I was not feeding her enough at a time and not quick[ly] enough. We then had the chance to speak to them in Thai and make sure they had slept properly the night before and were happy and healthy.

The next part was my favorite part of the trip. […] We had the opportunity to scrub them and play in the water with each of our elephants. It was interesting to see that some of the elephants really liked the water and others did not. Afterwards we rode our elephants to lunch. This ride was not what I was expecting, as we rode for thirty minutes straight up a mountain and only had a rope to hold on to.

Dr. Powell and a baby elephant, courtesy of Dr. Powell

Molly Zydel ’19 seconded the opinions of her fellow students, adding that:

The trip as a whole was absolutely amazing. I couldn’t have asked for a better first experience out of the country. As for favorite parts of the trip, I absolutely adored our time in Chaing Mai. The city was gorgeous, and not near[ly] as overwhelming as Bangkok was. It reminded me a lot of home, which is why I think I loved it so much. While we were in that city, we also had an excursion where we got to be elephant care takers for a day. We each had our own elephant and we got to feed them, bathe them, and ride them. That day was phenomenal. It feels so surreal, even though I have pictures to prove it happened.

Zydel ’19

Hughes also mentioned a number of other fun activities that students were able to experience.

Some other things we did during the trip were visiting many temples all over Thailand, including the Grand Palace. We went to an adventure park at our hotel in Phetchabun, which is in the mountains, visited a factory, and went to Koh Samui, which is a gorgeous island in Thailand. We also were able to take a Muay Thai Boxing class, go to a rooftop restaurant, explore local night markets, and speak with monks.

Molly Zydel described her experience in Thailand as

[…] phenomenal. […] I could say so many things, but they all lead back to the statement of if you get the chance to travel abroad like this, do it. You won’t regret it. Even if it scares you half to death, do it. You find out somewhere in the middle of all of it that the experience is more exhilarating and eye-opening than it is scary. You change so much as a result of spending 3 weeks in another country that has such a different culture. Thailand was amazing. I just want to go back.

Ultimately, as Kiah Coflin ’19 concludes,

There are only so many aspects of a culture you can learn through a classroom […] [as seeing things] first hand teaches lessons better than any textbook ever can.

 

To see more pictures, go here to the official Facebook for the Thailand May Term. If you haven’t read the first part of the Thailand blog post, click here.

Thank you to everyone who helped with this post and were willing to write and submit pictures.

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Dr. Powell’s May Term to Thailand Part I

Twelve students from multiple disciplines, including psychology, went to Thailand this past summer with psychology professor, Dr. Darcey Powell to study emerging adulthood as part of a May Term program at Roanoke College.

Over the course of three weeks, students were able to compare the empirical articles they had read before departure with their own experiences as they traveled across Thailand to cities including Bangkok, Phetchabun, Chiang Mai, and Koh Samui. While there, they discussed cultural similarities and differences with local emerging adults in Thailand. By traveling from city to city, students were able to see how socioeconomic settings and geography affect the lives of different emerging Thai adults.

As Peyton Holahan ’19 recalls,

The readings for our May Term were really interesting and relevant to the cultures and places we encountered. The topics in our readings varied from the collectivist[…] ideals in Thai society, to the importance of education, to the role of the transgender community in Thailand. Almost every day, we would have group discussions about our assigned readings and consider how the readings related to what we experienced or could possibly experience in our daily ventures.

Holahan ’19

When asked to talk about one of the most interesting parts of their trip, multiple students talked about their visit to Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok where they were able to interact with Thai students. Through talking one-on-one with each other and asking questions about their social and academic lives, they came to realize that perhaps they were not so different after all.

Holahan describes how her group quickly learned that social media plays a huge role in Thai student’s everyday lives, just as media does in the United States. In fact, because of the interactions with the Chulalongkorn students, Ms. Holahan came to realize that:

[…]the Thai students in Bangkok had very similar lives to our own in that most of them were working towards getting a degree and were still financially dependent on their parents. Spending the day at Chula and getting to know Thai students on a personal level completely contradicted my initial belief that our cultures were so far apart.

Sarah Hughes ’19 also mentioned her experiences talking with the psychology graduate students at Chulalongkorn University.

[…] It was funny[;] the first question they asked was about our current president and our political systems. They did not understand that our political system creates conflicts because in Thailand everyone worships the Royal Family. […] One conversation that stood out to me was when a student asked if our traffic jams in the U.S. only lasted approximately thirty minutes. I thought this was a strange question, but I shortly learned that it is easier to walk somewhere than drive because traffic jams can last for three hours.

Sarah Hughes ’19

Molly Zydel ’19 noted that for all the similarities, Thai and USA cultures are fundamentally different.

Thai culture is very different from US culture, in so many ways. First off, it is a collectivist[…] culture, meaning they emphasize the collective whole rather than the individual. This was observed in many ways, but especially in the way they treated each other. I never once saw a Thai person yelling. Thai people are also much more conservative. They don’t really like talking about themselves. 

Molly Zydel ’19

This was most noticeable during the talk with graduate students from Chulalongkorn University, as Zydel continued on to say.

[…] As Americans, we were much more open to answering questions about ourselves, but when we asked them questions, the Thai students often struggled in speaking up to answer them, especially when we asked questions that were uncomfortable in the first place (e.g. we asked about sex outside of marriage and if it happened, and that question clearly made them uncomfortable).

Through their traveling, students were further exposed to various ways of thinking about life and their own culture. For Sarah Hughes ’19, the first few moments in Thailand were a startling contrast with her home in Maryland.

As soon as we landed in Bangkok I noticed many differences. For starters[,] the airport was half-inside and half-outside. We had been traveling for 23 hours in nice cold air conditioning and the second you stepped into the airport it felt like 100 degrees or more because of the humidity. Before our trip, everyone had told us to prepare for the heat but none of us expected it to be as hot and as humid as it was. I am from Maryland near Washington D.C. and I thought I knew what humidity was, but oh[,] I was wrong. The humidity in Thailand was something I have never experienced before.

Sarah Hughes ’19

Later, Ms. Hughes began to notice something else about the differences between the United States of America and Thailand.

In the United States we tend to separate poor areas from the rich areas, but in Thailand you will have a gorgeous temple that the Rama (king) built next to shacks that people live in. It stood out to me because you would have thousands of tourist[s] admiring these stunning buildings and next door are [the homeless] or people that live in a small shack without running water.

These observations fall in line with the readings, as Peyton Holahan noted…

I remember leading a group discussion on two readings about the importance of social class in society. These readings directly related to our experiences because it was clear that social class in Thai society affected the paths of Thai emerging adults as to whether they got an education or started working at a young age to support themselves. Social class was a key factor in many of the places we visited because we witnessed higher social classes in urban areas like Bangkok.

In cities like Bangkok, education was emphasized for emerging adults because they were in an urban setting with plenty of accessible resources that stressed academic goals for better jobs and opportunities. On the other hand, we also witnessed the extent of lower social classes in more rural areas like Phetchabun. In such areas, emerging adults usually resorted to working at young ages to support their families instead of pursuing higher education because it was rarely an option within their socioeconomic sphere.

In addition to these observations and experiences, students were also able to have some fun as well. Continue to part II to learn about some of the student’s and professor’s favorite parts of the trip, including getting to spend the day with elephants.

 

To see more pictures of the trip, click here to go to the official RC May Term Facebook Page.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC @RC_Psychology
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Questioning about Armenian Genocide

Throughout the semester Dr. Gornick and her Psychology of Genocide class pondered, discussed and evaluated some of the most horrific human rights violations the world has seen. Sifting through tough psychological concepts (conflicting moral values, tyrants, discrimination -dehumanization and scapegoating, individual helping and international aid, guilt- survivors paradox and reconciliation) a larger picture emerged linking personal experiences to national and international concerns.

Midway through the semester, students were anonymously told about a member of our campus community who’s family survived the Armenian Genocide. From this discussion, students wrote amazing, professional, compelling and companionate interview questions. Thanks to Dr. Jennifer Berenson the following video was made to answer those questions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJvZGvf5-lE

 

Get connected!
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Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

So You’re Joining A Cult. Here Are 10 Things You Should Know.

Featured is the 10th and final Buzzfeed-style blog post from Dr. Osterman’s Social Psychology class! This article focuses on cult life.

Click this link to learn more!

Get connected!
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Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

So You Got a Bid, Now What?: 10 Things Psychology Can Tell Us About Greek Life

Featured is the ninth post from Dr. Osterman’s Social Psychology class! This article focuses on Greek Life behaviors.

Click this link to learn more!

Get connected!
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Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

10 Differences in Psychology between Eastern and Western Cultures You Won’t Believe!

For the next couple of weeks, we will be featuring Dr. Osterman’s social psychology class assignment where they were tasked with researching and writing a Buzzfeed-style article on a number of topics.

 The first article focuses on differences among Eastern and Western cultures. Click this link to learn more!

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
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Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Gilley, Claros and Gornick at the Society of Southeastern Social Psychologists (SSSP) Conference

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Three members of the Rhetoric and Social Perception (RASP) Lab, Sean Gilley, Nataly Claros, and Dr. Gornick journeyed to Asheville, NC to present research on politics and integrative complexity. Originally proposed as a poster, their presentation Secretaries of State: A Brief Rhetorical Analysis was offered one of ten data blitz spots.  Sean Gilley did an amazing job presenting in this difficult format! Overall the conference was a great success and we hope to repeat the trip next November!

 

Get connected!
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Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
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Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Summer Counselor Positions

Florida International University Center for Children and Families 2017 Summer Treatment Program — Counselor Positions

by Eduardo Merille
by Eduardo Merille

The Center for Children and Families at Florida International University announces Summer Treatment Program Counselor positions for 2017. The Summer Treatment Program (STP) provides services to children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Conduct Disorder, Oppositional-Defiant Disorder, learning problems, and related behavior problems. The program provides treatment tailored to children’s individual behavioral and learning difficulties. Counselors will work in the STP-PreK, for children in preschool or entering Kindergarten, or the STP-E, for children ages 6-12 in elementary school. The Center for Children and Families is directed by William E. Pelham, Jr., Ph.D., who is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Florida International University. Paulo Graziano, Ph.D., and Katie Hart, Ph.D., are the Program Directors for the STP-PreK, and Erika Coles, Ph.D., is the Program Director for the STP-E.

The dates of employment for the Counselor position are Monday, June 5, 2017 through Saturday, August 12, 2017. Counselor hours of employment are 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM, Monday through Friday, and on Saturday, August 12. In addition, Counselors continue to work with the children until 8:30 PM one evening each week while parents participate in weekly parent training groups.

Counselors are paid a salary of $4,000 for the summer. In addition, current students may be able to arrange for academic course credit through their university departments.

Read more below!

Continue reading Summer Counselor Positions

Psychological Adaptation

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Go ahead and please click this link to read Dr. Osterman’s PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology class’s fourth and final post on a psychological adaptation. This one is on evolved taste preferences and aversions.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Why Pineapples Don’t Belong on Pizza

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(3rd of 4th blog post done by PSYC 376 students)

Dr. Osterman’s  PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology students examined the topic of the evolutionary function of morning sickness.

Please visit this link to read more about the topic of morning sickness!!

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Psych Students’ Blogs

Check out Dr. Osterman’s PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology’s blog! The students spent all semester working on their posts; this week’s topic is cognitive adaptations to detect cheaters in social exchanges.

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Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Psych Students’ Blogs

Check out Dr. Osterman’s PSYC 376: Evolutionary Psychology’s blog! The students spent all semester working on their posts; this week’s topic is the biological fear of small animals.

animal-meme

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Shannon Yard and her Semester in D.C.

Shannon Yard ’18, a junior Psychology major, is a health and basic needs intern during her time at the Lutheran College Washington Semester Program.
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“I am the Health and Basic Needs Intern at Horton’s Kids. HK is an organization devoted to serving the Wellington Park community in DC’s Ward 8. Most recently at work I called over fifty mental health providers to find one that would be a good partner for us to provide counseling and therapy to the children enrolled in our program. My supervisor has set up meetings with a few potential matches, but during the process I learned more about the many differences in counseling and therapy practices and had to evaluate which ones would be the best for our kids. On a day-to-day basis, I distribute diapers to parents in need, help families access the emergency food pantry, and (my personal favorite) work directly with the kids during homework help or tutoring.

Continue reading Shannon Yard and her Semester in D.C.

Mind Over Mid-terms: A Mindset Intervention

 

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See the link below to learn more about how to adapt your mindset about your upcoming midterms!

Mind Over Midterms

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Welcome to Our New Faculty Members!

LETS GIVE A BIG WELCOME TO THE PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT’S NEWEST MEMBERS!

Athena Buckthought

Dr. Athena Buckthought

Dr. Buckthought received her B.Sc. in Physics, M.Sc. in Psychology (Neuroscience) and a Ph.D. in Psychology (’04) from Carleton University, in Ottawa, Canada. Her current research interests are visual perception, cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, specifically looking at stereopsis and motion parallax, as well as using psychophysics and functional brain imaging.

She is currently teaching Cognitive Psychology and Psychology in the Media. Dr. Buckthought is looking to recruit students for her research lab. More information on her lab and the type of students she is looking for can be found at: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology/research_and_internships/undergraduate_research/dr_buckthoughts_research_lab

Dr. Mills-Smith

Dr. Laura Mills-Smith

Dr. Mills-Smith received B.A.s in Anthropology (’09), English (’09), and Psychology (’10) from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, an M.S. in Psychology (’13) from Virginia Tech, and a Ph.D. in Psychology with a specialization in developmental science (’16) from Virginia Tech. Dr. Mills-Smith’s research focuses on infant language learning and the social context in which it happens, specifically focusing on basic interests in audiovisual perception, face processing, joint attention, and the role and importance of contingency for language acquisition and social development.

She is currently teaching Intro to Psychology and Developmental Psychology. More information on Dr. Mills-Smith’s research lab can be found at: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology/research_and_internships/undergraduate_research/dr_mills-smiths_research_lab.

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Pathways Summer Internship Program

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This summer, as a part of the Pathways Summer Internship Program, Consumer Products Safety Commission is offering an internship to any current full-time or part-time student who resides within the D.C. Metro area.

Students should have at least a 3.0 GPA and are required to submit a resume and a college transcript, as well as answering interview questions. The deadline for this internship is MARCH 28.

Please see link for more information and application: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/433063900/

** If you do apply, make sure to select Social Sciences GS-0199.

If you have any questions about the internship, please contact Dr. Powell (dpowell@roanoke.edu), as she has previously participated in this internship opportunity.

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Zentangle!

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On the Thursday before midterm exams began RC Psychology Association and Psi Chi, with support from Zentangle Inc., hosted a Zentangle: De-stress & Refocus event for students at the college. Psychology students could earn research credit and Honors program students could earn class I credit for attendance. More than 35 students came out to Zentangle! During the event, students heard about the technique known as Zentangle (https://www.zentangle.com/) and created their own Zentangle square. Additionally, the students left the session with a Zentangling pen and a couple squares so they could continue Zentangling on their own as they geared up for midterms. Everyone seemed to enjoy the session, so we hope to have Sacil back on campus in the future for another de-stressing and refocusing event! 

 

Get connected!
Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/ (Join RC Psychology group)

DR. NICHOLS’S INQ 277: EXPERIENCING VISION

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These photos, taken by Stephanie Buturla, were a part of Dr. Nichols’s INQ 277 May term titled “Exploring Vision Through the Eye of the Lens”.

This class utilized the digital camera as both a metaphor for the human eye and as a tool to create photographic representations of principles of human vision.  Cameras and the human eye were compared and contrasted in order to better understand both. Mechanisms of human visual perception, such as color vision, depth perception, and motion perception, were discussed in lecture format and then assignments carried out wherein students take purposeful photographs to illuminate the discussion topics.  The idea is that application through photography of principles discussed in relation to human vision, i.e. how we sense and perceive the world, may give us a better understanding of how and why the human vision system works the way it does.  Photographic expeditions were done both around campus and as part of full day trips.

DR. NICHOLS’S INQ 277: EXPERIENCING VISION

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These photos, taken by Gaby Ghosn, were a part of Dr. Nichols’s INQ 277 May term titled “Exploring Vision Through the Eye of the Lens”.

This class utilized the digital camera as both a metaphor for the human eye and as a tool to create photographic representations of principles of human vision.  Cameras and the human eye were compared and contrasted in order to better understand both. Mechanisms of human visual perception, such as color vision, depth perception, and motion perception, were discussed in lecture format and then assignments carried out wherein students take purposeful photographs to illuminate the discussion topics.  The idea is that application through photography of principles discussed in relation to human vision, i.e. how we sense and perceive the world, may give us a better understanding of how and why the human vision system works the way it does.  Photographic expeditions were done both around campus and as part of full day trips.

Dr. Nichol’s INQ 277: Experiencing Vision

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These photos, taken by Kristen Macquire, were a part of Dr. Nichol’s INQ 277 May term titled “Exploring Vision Through the Eye of the Lens”.

This class utilized the digital camera as both a metaphor for the human eye and as a tool to create photographic representations of principles of human vision.  Cameras and the human eye were compared and contrasted in order to better understand both. Mechanisms of human visual perception, such as color vision, depth perception, and motion perception, were discussed in lecture format and then assignments carried out wherein students take purposeful photographs to illuminate the discussion topics.  The idea is that application through photography of principles discussed in relation to human vision, i.e. how we sense and perceive the world, may give us a better understanding of how and why the human vision system works the way it does.  Photographic expeditions were done both around campus and as part of full day trips.

Summer Psych Classes!

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It’s not too late to sign up for classes over the summer!

Summer Term 1 (June 1st to June 26th):
Psych 270 A – Drugs & Behavior with Dr. Allen
“An examination of the mechanisms of actions, uses, effects and abuse liability of a range of drugs. Both therapeutic drugs (such as antidepressants and antipsychotics) and recreational drugs (such as alcohol, stimulants and marijuana) will be addressed.”

Summer Term 2 (June 29th to July 24th):
Psych 325 A – Social Psychology with Dr. Osterman
“Study of the influence of people on each other’s behavior, including social influence and social interaction.

Psych 450 A – History of Psychology with Dr. Buchholz
“Examination of the major systems in psychology with an emphasis on its 19th-century origins to the present.”