Category Archives: Uncategorized

congratulations TO Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand

Psychology faculty member Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand has recently had TWO publications. Her recent work is now published in the The Journal of Genetic Psychology and Emerging Adulthood. The psychology department extends our congratulations as we celebrate Dr. FVN’s recent accomplishments. Read about her publications below.

Image Not Avaliable

Interpersonal Rejection and Social Motivation in Adolescence: Moderation by Narcissism and Gender

Abstract: “Research on interpersonal rejection is voluminous, but less is known about perceived rejection in relation to social goals among peers during adolescence, especially while also considering factors that may moderate these associations. In a correlational design, we surveyed a diverse sample of middle school students to examine concurrent (Study 1; N = 269) and short-term longitudinal (Study 2; N = 321) links between rejection and adolescent communal (affiliation, closeness) and agentic (status, influence) goals, and narcissism and gender as moderators in the associations between rejection and social goals. Rejection was negatively related to (Study 1) and predicted decreases in (Study 2) communal goals. Narcissism was positively related to and predicted increases in agentic goals, and moderated the association between rejection and agentic goals (in both studies). One moderated effect of gender was found: perceived rejection predicted decreases in agentic goals for girls, but increases in agentic goals for boys. Our findings mostly align with existing research on interpersonal rejection in youth, and extend this literature by demonstrating that perceived rejection is meaningfully related to changes in trait-like social goals among peers, suggesting it may alter not only situation-specific cognitions, but also globalized goals, or motivations for peer interaction. The findings also call for further research on individual differences in associations between rejection and social goals, along with other outcomes.”


Popularity According to Emerging Adults: What is it, and How to Acquire it

Abstract: “Status among peers likely continues to play a role in social functioning and well-being beyond adolescence. This study examined how emerging adults in tertiary education defined popularity, and their beliefs regarding aggressive and prosocial behaviors affording status. The role of status motivation, own status, and gender in these definitions and beliefs were explored. Emerging adults primarily associated popularity with being central, liked, and respected. Gender prototypical features (attractiveness and likeability for women; power and centrality for men) were associated with high popularity. Compared to adolescence, popularity in emerging adulthood was associated more with likeability and less with attractiveness, power, fitting in, or antisocial behavior. Prosocial behavior, openness, extraversion, and dominance were identified as the most important ways to acquire popularity. The findings indicate that popularity is relevant to emerging adults and offer several directions for future research in order to benefit the social well-being of emerging adults in tertiary education.”

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

job opportunity alert

Research Coordinator Position in the JK Lifespan Development lab, Virginia Tech

Applications are invited for a full-time research coordinator (lab manager) position in the JK Lifespan Development lab of Dr. Jungmeen Kim-Spoon, in the Department of Psychology at Virginia Tech (https://support.psyc.vt.edu/labs/jklifespan). Projects in the lab combine developmental psychopathology and decision neuroscience to investigate brain function, emotion, cognition and personality processes, decision making and health behaviors. We use a variety of methods including structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, behavioral tasks, interviews, and questionnaires. This is an excellent opportunity for a personable, motivated, and detail-oriented person seeking further research experience before applying to graduate school.  

Primary data collection responsibilities will include: recruiting young adults and family members; scheduling visits; obtaining behavioral assessments and fMRI scanning; and oversight of data collection. Primary data management responsibilities include: management and oversight of participant databases, entering data, ensuring data reliability and completeness, and preparing data for analysis. Additional key tasks include assisting with participant tracking and retention, preparation of IRB materials, and training graduate and undergraduate students on study procedures. Training for all aspects of the position, including MRI certification, will be provided. Flexible scheduling is required (e.g., evenings, weekends, and some holidays will be required). 

Desired qualifications include: 1) BA/BS in psychology, neuroscience, or related fields; 2) undergraduate or post-baccalaureate research experience, including participant recruitment and data collection; 3) demonstrated organizational and time management skills, leadership skills, interpersonal skills, and attention to detail. Experience in the administration of standard psychological assessments (including self-report, structured interviews, and behavioral tasks) and a basic understanding of data management or analysis with corresponding data (e.g., SPSS, Excel, etc.) will be considered a strength.

Required application materials: Cover letter including statement of interest, CV/Resume, list of two references. Two letters of recommendation will be required prior to final consideration.

Expected start date is early March 2022. Graduating seniors are eligible to apply if they can start working part-time (10-20 hours/week) during the Spring 2022 semester to be hired before transitioning to a full-time position upon graduation. Consideration of applications will begin immediately and on a rolling basis and will end when the position is filled. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Virginia Tech is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and is committed to cultural diversity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Apply at: www.jobs.vt.edu, Job # to search: [518893].

Pre-submission inquiries may be emailed to: Kathryn Tarnai, ktarnai@vt.edu (Research Coordinator for JK Lifespan Development Lab).

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Finish the Semester Strong!!!!

When you should study and helpful tips ?

  • try to study at least a week before your exam
  • it is best to study each day for a shorter amount of time than to cram the night before
  • if your professor has not posted a study guide: begin reviewing your notes and old quizzes
  • study smarter not harder.. set an alarm for how long you are going to study and do not check your phone during that time (put on airplane mode)
  • study with someone in your class
  • truly test yourself- ask yourself questions and answer them without notes in front of you
  • writing out notes seems to be more effective in remembering information than typing

Resources:

Take Care of Yourself

  • make sure to get enough sleep (ideally 8 hours)
  • eat a good meal before an exam
  • exercise can help reduce stress and is a good study break
  • keep your room and desk clean and tidy , there is the saying “Cluttered desk means cluttered mind” for a reason
  • and remember these tests do not define you!
  • Study hard and then relax on winter break 🙂

Good Luck !

New Majors Orientation

When? Thursday, November 18th from 4:30pm-5:30pm

Where? Life Science Room 502

This event is for anyone who is planning to major in Psychology, recently declared their major in the Psych Department, or is a psychology major and has not been able to attend this event previously.

This meeting will be very informative because we will be discussing topics such as requirements for a degree in Psychology, internship opportunities, concentrations within the major, research, and studying abroad.

If you are not sure what direction you want to go with your degree, that is okay! We are going to be talking about the many different options there are.

P.S. When you attend this event you get to sign the major’s board!

UNC Clinical Rehabilitation & Mental Health Counseling Program

The Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health (CRMH) Counseling department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has extended an invitation to students who may be interested in pursuing a degree in counseling to come to one of their upcoming Information Sessions on the following dates:

Wednesday 11/17 12:00 pm-1:00 pm ET
Monday 12/16 11:30am-12:30pm ET
Tuesday 01/11 12:00 pm-1:00pm ET
Friday 02/11 4:00pm-5:00pm ET

In addition to their website, which can be found here, the Information Sessions are a good way to find out more about the CRMH program from a faculty member, ask questions about the program and application process, and meet with current students to hear about the program from their perspective. Interested students may RSVP to any of the above dates at CRMHinfo@med.unc.edu to receive the Zoom link for the Information Session.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

making the most of Your time as a psychology student

  • Research

If research in the field interests you, there are many ways to get involved here at Roanoke!

Also check out the Psychology Blog: http://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/

New Publication Alert: Dr. Powell & Stephanie Gaines

gold dragon statue during daytime

Congratulations to Dr. Darcey Powell and alumni Stephanie Gaines (class of 2017) on their recent publication by Psi Chi. The publication is based on one of Gaines’s projects that took place in Dr. Powell’s lab during her time at Roanoke College. More information about the information can be found here, but you can read the abstract below:

Emerging adulthood is a time of great transition, including but not limited to the commencement of “adult roles” and responsibilities. The present study examined emerging adults’ (EAs’) perceptions of transitional (i.e., cohabitating, marriage, parenting) and gradual (i.e., religious beliefs, political beliefs, managing own health) roles. Participants were recruited from a small liberal arts college (N = 88) and from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk platform (N = 181). They were surveyed on the age at which they anticipated or reported achieving the examined roles and their current self-efficacy for the roles. Female EAs reported intending to or achieving the transitional roles at a significantly later age than female EAs of the late 20th century (ps ≤ .001, ds 0.77–0.95). Additionally, female EAs anticipated role achievement for cohabitating, marriage, parenting, and religious beliefs at later ages than male EAs (ps < .05, gs 0.33–1.33). Moreover, male and female EAs differed in a few role-specific self-efficacies if they had not yet achieved the desired adult role (e.g., marriage, parenting; ps < .05, gs 0.62–0.98), but did not differ if they had already achieved the role. Lastly, the difference between EAs’ age and their role achievement largely did not predict their role-specific self-efficacies. The results provide additional insight into EAs’ expectations and current perceptions of themselves and may be useful to individuals who work regularly with EAs who are apprehensive about the extent to which they are “on time” and “ready” to engage in the examined transitional and gradual roles.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Midterms approaching… are you prepared?

Frustrated Over It GIF by The Dude Perfect Show

The only thing scarier than Halloween this month is mid-terms. Have you started (even thinking) about studying yet? Whether you have a color-coded plan or this is the first time you’re realizing mid-terms are a thing, here are some tips and tricks to stay calm, stay smart, and ultimately ace your quickly approaching mid-terms week. Remember, you’ve got this!

Study Smarter

Have you ever really used the school’s academic resources? Please do! In addition to going to your professors’ office hours, students should check out the Goode-Pasfield Center for Learning and Teaching, which is located in the Fintel Library and is the focal point for academic counseling and academic support on campus. The staff will assist you in identifying your academic strengths and weaknesses, designing an individual study program, and resolving your academic concerns. The Center coordinates academic advising for undeclared students, the Writing Center, the Subject Tutoring Program, the RC Success Program, and Accessible Education Services. Dr. Sue Brown directs the Academic Services. Dr Sandee McGlaun directs the Writing Center. Check out this site for instructions on how to make your own study schedule.

Mix Up Your Methods

We all know that awful feeling of sitting in your dorm room and staring at assignments for too long. It is exhausting and drain us of the little motivation we have left at this point during the semester. Try switching up your study location (the library, an open classroom, off-campus coffee shops, etc.) to add some variety into your routine.

If the way you’re studying is the problem, try using an online learning tool or asking a friend to quiz you so you get a break from reviewing your notes. In fact, ask a couple of friends if they would like to get together and set up a study session. You can work on similar tasks or completely different ones – but having someone else there may help keep you accountable for the work you’re meant to be doing.

Stay Calm

Feelings of anxiety and stress are almost unavoidable for college students as a busy week approaches, but there are plenty of things you can do for yourself that will help you remain calm and, ultimately, perform better. The main thing is to get some sleep. You might be tempted to pull an all-nighter, but a good night’s sleep is key to your success. An extra hour of sleep will take you wayyyy farther than an extra hour of cramming for an exam. Next, remind yourself that you can do this. You were smart enough to make it this far, and you are smart enough to make it through mid-terms. Remember to use your support network: friends, family, and faculty and staff are here to help you make it through stressful times.

Im Okay Keeping Up With The Kardashians GIF by E!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Graduate school panel

This is a great opportunity for all Roanoke students! At this panel you can ask any questions you have in regards to graduate school. This event takes place tomorrow (9/28) from 12-1 in life science 502! Bonus- there will be pizza for everyone! I hope to see you there!

Thinking about psychology?

…we know you are…

What you need to know about the department:
Majors, minors, and concentrations

Hey new (or not-so-new) students! Have you been debating joining the Psychology Department at Roanoke College? Or maybe just wanting to know more about our programs? You’re in the right spot! Below are the basics about the department and different programs we offer. More information can always be found online or acquired through professors and student assistant staff. Let us know your questions!

Major in Psychology

Note: The requirements listed below are for students declaring the Psychology Major anytime after 8-11-2021. To see OLD requirements for those declaring the major prior to this date, please refer to our website.

chart of units that must be completed

The psychology major is a bachelor of science and requires the completion of 12 units. These units include core (general and methods) classes, one class from each of the 4 domains of psychology, and three elective classes.

Minor in Psychology

chart of units that must be completed

Psychology intersects with many other areas of study in a variety of ways because of its focus on people. A minor in psychology can be a useful addition to any major with the selection of courses tailored to fit what is most relevant to the student. The minor in psychology requires the completion of 6 units.

Human Development Concentration

Table of courses needed for the human development concentration

The Concentration in Human Development exposes students to the broader life-span perspective and allows them to focus on the stages (e.g., childhood, adolescence, adulthood) and the topics most applicable to their personal or professional goals. The concentration requires six units and the faculty coordinator is Dr. Powell.

Neuroscience Concentration

chart of units that must be completed

A concentration in neuroscience will offer students an opportunity to learn about theory and research on the brain and nervous system from a number of perspectives. Students will come to understand how developments in biology, psychology, chemistry and related fields alter knowledge and research techniques in the other fields. The faculty coordinator is Dr. Nichols.


Ready to declare? You can do so online here… or you can find a list of our amazing faculty members on this page. Contact one of them to find out more information on whichever program you may be interested in. And make sure to check out the spreadsheets with course information – you may be surprised by how diverse and interesting the Psychology Department’s curriculum can be. We can’t wait to have you!

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

rc psychology highlight: Research

Claire McDonald and Ben Campbell, both psychology seniors at Roanoke College, were recently featured on Roanoke’s website for their research experience. You can check out the full page here.

Claire McDonald, Class of 2022

Claire wasn’t sure what degree she wanted to pursue when she first came to Roanoke College. But during the fall semester of her sophomore year, she enrolled in a developmental psychology class, taught by Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand, assistant professor of psychology. She loved the class and, consequently, found her major.

In the spring of her sophomore year, McDonald joined a lab managed by Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand, which focused on adolescent and young adult peer relationships. This sparked her interest in research within psychology. This fall, Claire plans to work as a research intern at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Salem. She hopes to apply to graduate school to pursue a doctorate in clinical psychology with a specific interest in research related to dementia and cognitive impairment in older adults — experience Claire said she hopes to gain at the VA Medical Center. But she’s not the only psychology student that has recently made big steps in their research experience…

“Research has played a huge role in my college career and in my development as a student. It has been the most crucial and beneficial part of my college experience.”

Ben Campbell, Class of 2022

Ben Campbell has used his interest in relational aggression, peer social dynamics and gender to formulate a study. He used the study to apply for the College’s Summer Scholars Program and received the prestigious award, enabling him to carry a project titled “Effects of elicited jealousy on masculinity and relational aggression in men.” You can check out more info on his research journey in our previous blog post, found here.


In recent years, approximately 30 students each semester have been involved in research. The experiences are important not just for information discovery, but also for deepened learning, enhanced training on specific topics or methods, and the development of skills that graduate training programs and employers in careers utilizing psychology look for and highly value. As a research assistant, students also develop professional and mentoring relationships with their faculty mentor, and refine critical thinking and statistical reasoning skills.

“The experience to contribute to a discipline in a larger way is a special opportunity,” Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand said. “Apart from the professional skills developed, the research experiences students at Roanoke are involved in also contribute to the sense of community we have in the department.”

Research is the bedrock of the student experience in Roanoke College’s psychology department, which brought the College its seventh consecutive “Great Schools for Psychology Majors” recognition in The Princeton Review’s annual “Best Colleges” guidebook, released on Aug. 31.

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Get Connected!

Blog: https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology

Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

Instagram: rcpsychology

Congratulations to Ben Campbell!

Ben was just granted funding from Psi Chi, the International Honors Society in Psychology, for his research!

Benjamin Campbell ‘22 was recently a part of our Summer Scholars program here at Roanoke, during which he conducted a study that was built from previous work he completed in the Social Development Lab. Ben’s project is titled “Effects of Peer-Elicited Jealousy on Relational Aggression in Men: The Roles of Contingent and Threatened Masculinity”.  He worked very hard on this project, supervised by Dr. Danielle Findley-Van Nostrand. Leading up to the summer, they applied for and were successfully granted $1,118 to fund this and subsequent studies including Ben’s Honors in the Major Project. 

Project Abstract:

I asked Ben to give a summary of his research and he wrote,

“So, this summer I conducted a research project as a Summer Scholar at Roanoke. The study looked at how jealousy affects threatened masculinity and relational aggression use in men. In other words, does feeling jealous in a friendship context with other men also produce feeling less masculine, and thus result in using relational aggression? My results found that following jealousy provoked by male peers, men felt less masculine and used more relational aggression relative to men who were not in the jealousy condition. But, some effects did not emerge as expected. I applied for funding from the “Psi Chi Undergraduate Research Grant” and was awarded it. So, I got funding to continue my project. In my honors in the major, I plan on expanding on the summer project and potentially investigating other variables that may play into the effects I found this summer. Overall, I thought the summer scholars experience was great, and the funding from Psi Chi is amazing.”

Congratulations again to Benjamin Campbell, keep up the great work and we are excited for what your future has in store.

Welcome Back Social!

When? This Friday ! (September 3rd from 11:45-1:15)

Where? Courtyard between Life Science and Trexler!

Please join your fellow Psychology students and faculty at a Welcome Back social on Friday, 9/3! We will meet in the courtyard area between Life Science and Trexler between 11:45a and 1:15p. Snacks and drinks will be provided, plus you can purchase an RC Psychology shirt! All students are welcome – majors, minors, concentrators, students currently in psychology classes, and students who may potentially take psychology classes in the future! Hope to see you there!

Get connected:

Instagram & Twitter:  #PsychRC
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Blog:  https://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Linked In:  https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website:  http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology

CONGRATULATIONS VANESSA PEARSON: HONORS DEFENSE

Vanessa presenting during her defense on May 17, 2021

Congratulations to Vanessa Pearson ’21 for the successful defense of her Honors in the Major Project titled, “Influences on Paternity Leave” on May 17th. Her research mentor, Dr. Darcey N. Powell, was joined by committee members, Dr. Danielle Findley Van-Nostrand and Dr. David Nichols to oversee her defense. Her project abstract is pasted below.

Vanessa with her Honors in Psyc t-shirt!


Project Abstract:
The overall purpose of this study was to understand the factors that are involved when a father is deciding whether or not to take paternity leave with the birth/adoption of a child. The research was centered around two groups of participants. Study 1 sampled fathers with a child under the age of five. Study 2 sampled prospective fathers – men who are not yet fathers but may be at some point in the future. Participants completed an online survey that asked about their demographics, desired days off, and willingness to take certain types of leave. Most of the hypotheses were not significant or unable to be tested due to sample limitations. For example, several social-demographic factors were not associated with the number of days or types of leave one would take. Even though the findings were not significant, this could mean that the proportion of men who are taking or plan to take paternity leave are increasing and the factors that are holding them back are decreasing. Additionally, while fathers were more likely to know about FMLA than prospective fathers, a majority in both samples believed the US did not have an acceptable leave policy.

Congratulations again to Vanessa Pearson ’21 on a successful defense! We look forward to seeing all you accomplish in the future!

Success Stories for Alumni Amidst a Pandemic

We have all struggled throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, but along with the bad days came some very good ones! Psychology students at Roanoke College are no exception to this experience. This post is highlighting some  of the good that has come out of the past year: we are so proud of all of our students, but we especially want to shoutout the following graduates who have made the best of their situation and are one step closer to living their dream!

joelkirschenbaum happy celebrate yay skate GIF


Rachel Harmon

Rachel Harmon graduated after the Spring 2020 semester. We recently heard that she will be entering graduate school at the University of Alabama in the Fall of 2021! She will be working towards her Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology.  Congratulations Rachel!

Psychology Clinic – University of Alabama College of Arts & Sciences | The University of Alabama
https://psychologyclinic.ua.edu/


Sophie Bacon

Sophie Bacon graduated after the Spring 2020 semester. We were so excited to hear that she will be working towards her Masters in Human Development Counseling! She will be completing her masters degree in graduate school at Vanderbilt University in the Fall of 2021. Congrats Sophie!

Vanderbilt University - Profile, Rankings and Data | US News Best Colleges
https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/vanderbilt-3535


Ji’Asia Anderson

Ji’Asia Anderson is a recent graduate from Roanoke College. We are so proud to hear that she will be entering the workforce through a company called New Essecare of NJ as a case manager! This company focuses on helping people with mental illnesses in their daily lives and making sure that they are able to have basic skills to cope with their triggers and live independently. Congratulations!

https://www.timeout.com/new-jersey

Ji’Asia says that “you can tell that the people we work with appreciate the help and sometimes it’s the only help that they can get to help with their basic needs. I usually help my clients with making doctor appointments or finding primary doctors, working through coping skills to help them control their triggers for their disorders or help them identify them if they aren’t aware of their triggers. I talk to my clients daily to evaluate how they are doing and help provide them with activities to do at home, since most of them are bored and stressed out from being at home most of the day.”


In addition to the amazing work of the alumni showcased above, soon-to-be-graduated students like Lauren Powell are also working harder than ever! 

Lauren Powell is graduating at the end of this semester and has already solidified her plans to go to graduate school. She will be getting her M.Ed. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from the University of Lynchburg. She is excited because the department there seems a lot like the psychology department at Roanoke in that it is tightly knit and everyone is close.

Campus Store – University of Lynchburg

“I am so sad to leave Roanoke behind but my time here was incredible and I’m excited to move forward with my education. I know Roanoke prepared me well.” – Powell

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Local Organization Highlight: Thriving Families Counseling

A current Psychology student at Roanoke College, Grace Page, is completing an internship with Thriving Families Counseling, so we decided to highlight this local organization and share her experience and story. Thriving Families Counseling is a counseling center that provides services for adults, children, and adolescents.

Their services include individual, family, and group counseling sessions, and creative therapeutic modalities to address psychological distress (such as depression or anxiety), substance abuse, stress, family problems, grief, and much more.

The mission statement for Thriving Families Counseling (TFC) is: “to provide support, encouragement, compassion, and unconditional positive regard to adults, children, adolescents, and families while guiding them to find their inner resources and true Selves so that they may heal, grow, and learn to thrive in life”.

Grace Page is the first undergraduate intern TFC has ever had and sets a great example of how students can seek out engaging opportunities in the Roanoke Community. Grace had previously been a part of Roanoke’s Career Services’ Maroon Mentor program, and her mentor happened to work at TFC. After getting to know the Mentor, she was able to talk to her boss to work out an internship for Grace, creating the position based on Roanoke’s internship criteria.


“My favorite part about doing an internship is getting real-life experience working with someone in a position I hope to be in someday in the future.” – Grace Page


While TFC may not have other positions available for students, Grace sets an amazing example of what can happen when students step outside of their comfort zone a bit and independently search for meaningful opportunities. If struggling to find a place to start, students can always reach out to faculty members or the department’s head of internships, Dr. Findley-Van Nostrand.

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Get Involved In Roanoke

Looking for ways to get involved with your community, both on and off campus? We’re here to give you some ideas how to do just that!

Home | Roanoke College
https://www.roanoke.edu/

Roanoke College has a ton of different opportunities to get more involved in the psychology department.

  1. The first thing you can do is check out our recent post about research and internship opportunities. Titled, “Debating What To Do Over Summer”, this post gives you a good overview on what an internship/research opportunity is, how it can benefit you, and who to contact for more information.
  2. Join student organizations! The Roanoke College Psychology Association and Psi Chi National Honor Society in Psychology have more information on membership at this link.
  3. Our website homepage also has links for more information on working for the department as a student assistant, signing up for research studies, and following our multiple social media accounts (including a LinkedIn group)!

May be an image of 2 people
https://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology/photos/1283538528338346

If you are looking for ways to get involved in the community beyond Roanoke College, one of the best ways to do so is to volunteer! Depending on what your interests are, Roanoke City and Salem have plenty of opportunities suited for you!

  1. If you are interested in working with children, organizations like CHIP and the Community Youth Program are always on the lookout for passionate volunteers!
  2. If your interests revolve around an older population, hospice centers are often in desperate need for volunteers. BUT, there are also other opportunities to work with this population, such as with Friendship Retirement Community.
  3. There are plenty of more unique volunteer experiences in Roanoke and Salem that can highlight skills learned in psychology. Some of these include volunteering with Huddle Up Moms and Make A Wish of Greater Virginia.

Student Life | Roanoke College
https://www.roanoke.edu/studentlife

Besides volunteering, check out this calendar of events to stay up-to-date on what fun stuff is happening in and around Roanoke!

Whatever your passion is, we hope this gave you an idea of some of the awesome opportunities Roanoke College and the surrounding areas have to build a sense of community. Have any more ideas or great suggestions? Leave a comment below!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

Survey participants needed!

Kira Hunt, a rising senior in Psychology is recruiting participants for a study as part of her Honors Distinction Project. Please see below for details:

 

We would like to invite you to be in a research study focused on sharing information in online dating that would take no more than fifteen minutes of your time. We ask participants are between eighteen and twenty-five. Participants who provide contact information are eligible to enter a raffle for a ten dollar gift card. Click on the link below to get started!

https://roanoke.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3QS0ZIww5B4BhZz

Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology

G.R.A.C.E. LAB SUMMER PROGRAM!

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The Gender Race and Cultural Empowerment (G.R.A.C.E.) lab is hosting a 6-week summer program offering students the opportunity for one-on-one mentorship and research experience. The G.R.A.C.E. Lab’s emphasis is on social psychology with a focus on the experiences of Black women in STEM education.

Responsibilities include:

  • Recruiting study participants
  • Data collection and analyses
  • Attending weekly lab meetings

Qualifications for this position:

  • Strong academic performance in psychology,
    with a GPA requirement of 3.25 (overall and
    major)
  • Dependability and takes initiative
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
  • Rising juniors and seniors preferred

This program will run from June 8 – July 17, 2020, and will be hosted at Spelman College. You are expected to be committed for all 6 weeks. While attending this program, a stipend, housing for 6 weeks, and a campus meal plan will be included.

They will begin selecting applicants into the program on a rolling basis until February 14, 2020.

If you are interested in applying to this program follow this link and email your cover letter, curriculum vitae, and your most
recent unofficial academic transcript to Dr. Maria Jones, Postdoctoral Research Associate, at mjones35@spelman.edu!

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Get Connected!

Bloghttps://psych.pages.roanoke.edu/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/rcpsychology
Twitter: @RC_Psychology
Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/RC-Psychology-8140491/about
Website: http://www.roanoke.edu/inside/a-z_index/psychology
Instagram: rcpsychology